From: pautrey on
Excerpt From:
http://www.lamold.com/ask_a_doctor.html








What Tests Can Be Done To Help Diagnose Stachybotrys Toxicity?

No single medical test can pinpoint the level of exposure or body
damage caused by stachybotrys. Proper medical care and professional
decision making is necessary to assure that the affected individual is
treated properly.

Many physicians believe that the following tests are appropriate in
conducting a medical screening for stachybotrys:

Complete medical exam

Chest x-ray · Pulmonary function test

Complete red and white blood cell count

Blood sedimentation rate

Stachybotrys specific RAST antibody test

Immunoglobulin panel

Immune competence tests
Doctors should be encouraged to discuss the environmental situation
with the industrial hygiene professionals who have conducted sampling
in the building in question etc. .



What Are The Recommendations of Doug Haney, PhD. For Toxic Testing?

We have found that a blood-serum test cultured with agar agents known
as the Multiple Antigen Simultaneous Test (MAST) CLA, Environmental
IgG, Panel #15, conducted by Hitachi Chemical Diagnostics,®
Incorporated of Mountain View, California, and a genetic Polymerase
Chain Reaction (PCR) testing process conducted by ImmunoLabs,® Inc.,
in the Los Angeles, are both very helpful in detecting fungi levels in
the human body. There are also certain blood-serum tests available
through blood laboratories for the Stachybotrys species. These can be
expensive. Consult with, and work through your medical doctor if you
are going to have them ordered.



Can anything be saved? Can I save any of my family heirlooms? I have
Stachybotrys. I lived in it for 6 months. Have left everything behind
but wondering if I can save anything.

The answer to your question is complex. It largely depends upon those
items which you wish to save and to a lesser extent the type of
illness the Stachybotrys is causing you. Also, there are theoretical
considerations and considerations gained from practical experience.

On a practical basis, if you are simply allergic to the mold than you
could be more aggressive in saving items. However, if you suffer from
toxicity, like many of us do, then it is my earnest recommendation
that you be extremely cautious in trying to save anything or you will
probably deeply regret it. In my experience, after disposing three
automobiles and three houses, the only items that can be reasonably
'safely' retained are those that meet these requirements:

they are non-porous (they have durable, smooth surfaces)

they contain no cellulose or other organic material such as paper,
cardboard, wood, leather, cotton, wool, wall board etc.

they could be thoroughly washed in a washing machine.

Such items would include glass ware, dishes, silverware, CD ROMS,
coins etc.
There are at least two important considerations when one deals with
this mold.

(1). How long do the spores remain potentially viable once they are
released from the living stachybotrys mold?

The best answer I have received regarding this is: "Stachybotrys
spores can survive for at least a year after release. However, the
viability does decline with time. The environment they are in will
affect survival and rate of decline."

Thus, any item you try to salvage can carry some spores that
potentially could germinate, under the right conditions, in your new
environment.

(2). How long do the mycotoxins on stachybotrys spores remain potent
after the spores are discharged into the air?

The best answer I have received regarding this is: "The trichothecene
toxins are very stable. Again the environment matters, if stored dry,
there is little loss of activity for a year."

Thus, if mycotoxins on the mold cause you symptoms, if you carried
some of the dead spores on the material you tried to salvage, that
material could continue to make you ill for as long as the mycotoxins
remained potent.

The answers, in quotations, were kindly provided by Mr. Stephen Vesper
of the EPA.
Finally, there is no question that Five percent sodium hypochlorite
(bleach) will kill live mold. But, that doesn't solve your problem.
You need to denature the mycotoxins on the mold spores that are on
your contaminated material. This requires a substance that can
denature the mycotoxins, while preserving the material being treated.
I haven't found the answer to this question with any degree of
reasonable certainty.

I have tried to salvage some clothing, but it has been difficult,
risky, time consuming and in many cases failed, causing me a great
deal of grief. I managed to salvage some super silk shirts (100%
polyester) by repeated washings. In retrospect, it probably wasn't
worth the effort. Very porous clothing, such as sweaters, even of the
synthetic variety, don't seem to respond to a reasonable number of
washings, at least in my experience. Using bleach on these clothing
doesn't seem to help insofar as toxicity is concerned. And, forget
paper products, such as books, articles, magazines, miscellaneous
papers etc.



What are your symptoms and what has been effective treatment for you?

Symptoms included tremendous fatigue, malaise, muscle aches and
cramps, restlessness, inability to sleep, and severe burning in my
chest with exertion (due to profound pulmonary small airway disease).

My problem now is that I can't go near, much less work with, any paper
or books contaminated by the mold spores. This includes medical books,
charts, magazines etc. If I do get exposed become ill again anywhere
from a few days to a few weeks, depending upon the intensity and
length of exposure.

I found that with each exposure I got, my sensitivity would increase;
that is, it would take increasingly smaller amounts of the mycotoxins
on the spores to make me ill.

Also, I have become sensitized to incredibly small quantities of
smoke. If I get a few whiffs of smoke from a cigarette, cigar or
chimney (smoke from a fireplace), I'll get symptoms of fatigue,
malaise, flu-like symptoms and eve more severe burning in the chest
with exertion for a few hours to a day or two.

Regarding treatment, the five most effective measures are:

avoidance of living mold

avoidance of the mold spores

avoidance of contaminated items

avoidance of smoke

avoidance of fatigue (getting enough sleep)
The next five measures are:

6. inhalation ipatropium bromide (four times daily in a nebulizer)

7. inhalation albuterol sulfate (four times daily in a nebulizer)

8. inhalation fluticasone propionate 500 mcg and samletrol 50 mcg
(powder), 2
puffs daily (Advaid Diskus 500/50)

9. Theophylline 200-300 mg daily in divided doses

10. Being careful to get enough potassium and calcium (combination of
diet & pills).



(These are my own opinions from my personal experience, review of
medical literature, conversations with experts and conversations with
fellow sufferers. The following is not intended to be professional or
medical advice; it is advice gained from the experience of a victim of
toxic mold exposure.)

What should I do if I am sick and my house/apartment is found to have
stachybotrys and/or other toxic mold(s)?

Determine if you and/or you family have allergic or toxic symptoms.

If there is any question of toxicity whatsoever, then you and your
family should exit your current environment immediately; and, do not
bring any of your old possessions, especially including clothing,
books, furniture, bedding etc. (this will be further discussed in
another post).

You should seek medical attention from a qualified expert, but getting
out of the environment should be your top priority.

Persons affected by mold (especially the mycotoxins of mold) tend to
severely
underestimate the dangers from their exposure.

They tend to make their move far too late.

When they are eventually forced to move, they tend to make the mistake
of taking their possessions - especially ones made of paper,
cardboard, animal fibers (clothing), leather, and similar materials
which the mold can readily grow on. This causes cross contamination of
their new environment, and the process repeats itself.

If you are symptomatic form your mold exposure, get away from it. You
can replace the
material things, but you may not be able to replace your health!


What is the difference between an allergy to mold and a toxicity from
mold?

Allergic symptoms to mold would include sneezing; a running and itchy
nose; watering and itching of the eyes; nasal stuffiness; respiratory
symptoms such as wheezing and coughing, especially in asthmatics;
itching of the skin.

Toxic symptoms are due to mycotoxins on the mold spores. They can
include: memory loss ; attention deficit/concentration problems ;
personality changes such as irritability or depression; neurological
disorders such as tremors; tingling or burning of nose, mouth; chronic
fatigue; dizziness; nausea/vomiting; bleeding in the lungs;
suppression of the immune system; headache; flu-like symptoms; red
eyes (without watering or itching); incoordination; muscle spasms and
cramps; damage to internal organs. Toxic symptoms from these
mycotoxins have similarities to toxic symptoms from poisoning.
Stachybotrys spores produce multiple mycotoxins, including
trichothecenes. Trichothecenes have been produced commercially for use
in biological warfare. These are strong neurotoxins. Mycotoxins are
nearly all cytotoxic, disrupting various cellular structures such as
membranes, and interfering with vital cellular processes such as
protein, RNA and DNA synthesis

If you were to meet a person suffering from allergy to mold, that
person would most likely complain of symptoms similar to those of ‘hay
fever’. Those symptoms are detailed above under “allergic symptoms”.
The symptoms would most likely be described as annoying (with varying
degrees of annoyance); they would not, however, be described as
devastating. Their symptoms would be rather straight forward , easily
observable and easily understandable.

If you were to meet a person suffering from toxicity due to mold
mycotoxins, your first impression might be that the person is affected
by a mental problem. Your first thought might be that the person would
be best off consulting a psychiatrist or a psychologist. The person
might have a lot of vague symptoms – symptoms way out of proportion to
what you could observe – symptoms that might be difficult for the
affected person to explain and for you to understand. But, the
underling theme, if you listened carefully, would be that of toxicity.
Most likely the toxic person would complain of extreme fatigue,
weakness, tiredness, flu-like symptoms, and often respiratory
problems: but not usually coughing or wheezing. Instead, he/she would
complain of terrible burning or soreness in his/her lungs, possibly
aggravated with exertion or exercise. And, instead of telling you that
the experience was one of annoyance (to a lesser or greater degree) as
allergy sufferers would tell you, the toxic sufferer would more likely
describe her/his experience as a hellish nightmare.

The toxic sufferer’s behavior would more likely be that of a frantic
effort to get away from the contaminated source and an almost
paranoiac effort to rid themselves of contaminated materials. This is
in stark contrast to the allergic sufferer who would most likely find
the offending mold to be more of a nuisance rather than a substance
sent from hell.



What is more specific advice regarding continuing toxic mold exposure?

1. First, and foremost, if this mold is making you and /or your family
old ill, my advice is to get out of that environment now! Continued
exposure may increase the chances for a
chronic problem and/or permanent damage. Go to a motel if necessary,
while you are
waiting for your new quarters.

2. You must be sure to accurately identify the mold(s); they could
include Stachybotrys and/ or other toxic molds. Make sure that the lab
testing your environment is familiar with the identification of
stachybotrys and/or other toxic molds.

3. Don't disturb the mold or try to treat it yourself. If it is
stachybotrys and you disturb it, you may cause the mold to sporulate
(produce a bioaerosol).The spores can be extremely toxic and damaging
to susceptible individuals.

4. If it is stachybotrys, (and this may be also true for other toxic
species) don't take anything with you when you move. This may sound
harsh, but if you bring items contaminated with stachybotrys spores
into your new environment you still may stay sick and you may have to
repeat the process all over. Although, the spores are not living, they
are much more toxic than the living mold as they carry strong
mycotoxins which can cause all the symptoms you describe. The items I
have found to be especially bad are all paper products including
books, magazines, files of papers, cardboard, news papers and so
forth. Also, the mold clings to fabric such as stuffed furniture,
bedding, carpet, and clothing. You may get away with items that have
smooth surfaces and that are easily washable such as dishes, pots,
pans, glasses, silverware etc.

5. The precautions I mentioned in item #4 are from my own personal
experience with
stachybotrys and may not apply to other molds or all individuals
exposed to stachybotrys. However, if you do find stachybotrys, and as
both you and your child are quite symptomatic, I would give very
serious thought to item #4. Also, I know that there are others exposed
to stachybotrys who have had similar experiences.


NOTE: The views expressed on this page are solely the views of Dr.
Joseph Klein and his associates and/or resources. The views expressed
on this page are not necessarily reflective of the views or opinions
AMI, however, our goal is always to provide unbiased resources for
reliable information. AMI has no business affiliation or personal
relationship with Dr. Klein. We referenced his material because he is
not trying to sell anything.

Read More:
http://www.lamold.com/ask_a_doctor.html
From: Peter B. on
I sure wish that google would follow normal conventions on the Usenet and
text posting rather than run their own Drew course.

"pautrey" <rpautrey2(a)gmail.com> wrote in message
news:748a2511-95c1-46dd-be08-2002c6bdf40a(a)30g2000vbi.googlegroups.com...
Excerpt From:
http://www.lamold.com/ask_a_doctor.html

=========================================
Obviously the replies are not generated by an MD.
-------------------------------------------------------------


What Tests Can Be Done To Help Diagnose Stachybotrys Toxicity?

No single medical test can pinpoint the level of exposure or body
damage caused by stachybotrys. Proper medical care and professional
decision making is necessary to assure that the affected individual is
treated properly.

Many physicians believe that the following tests are appropriate in
conducting a medical screening for stachybotrys:

Complete medical exam

Chest x-ray � Pulmonary function test

Complete red and white blood cell count

Blood sedimentation rate

Stachybotrys specific RAST antibody test

Immunoglobulin panel

Immune competence tests
Doctors should be encouraged to discuss the environmental situation
with the industrial hygiene professionals who have conducted sampling
in the building in question etc. .
===================================
This guy is all over the place and still hasn't hit all the bases.
----------------------------------------------------


What Are The Recommendations of Doug Haney, PhD. For Toxic Testing?
=============================================
I don't know nut based on his writing below, if Ralph didn't mess it up, is
a PhD not a MD.
--------------------------------------------------------------------

We have found that a blood-serum test cultured with agar agents known
as the Multiple Antigen Simultaneous Test (MAST) CLA, Environmental
IgG, Panel #15, conducted by Hitachi Chemical Diagnostics,�
Incorporated of Mountain View, California, and a genetic Polymerase
Chain Reaction (PCR) testing process conducted by ImmunoLabs,� Inc.,
in the Los Angeles, are both very helpful in detecting fungi levels in
the human body. There are also certain blood-serum tests available
through blood laboratories for the Stachybotrys species. These can be
expensive. Consult with, and work through your medical doctor if you
are going to have them ordered.



Can anything be saved? Can I save any of my family heirlooms? I have
Stachybotrys. I lived in it for 6 months. Have left everything behind
but wondering if I can save anything.

The answer to your question is complex. It largely depends upon those
items which you wish to save and to a lesser extent the type of
illness the Stachybotrys is causing you. Also, there are theoretical
considerations and considerations gained from practical experience.

On a practical basis, if you are simply allergic to the mold than you
could be more aggressive in saving items. However, if you suffer from
toxicity, like many of us do, then it is my earnest recommendation
that you be extremely cautious in trying to save anything or you will
probably deeply regret it. In my experience, after disposing three
automobiles and three houses, the only items that can be reasonably
'safely' retained are those that meet these requirements:
=============================================
This part really bothers me. He starts of with "simply allergic" as if to
say these are minor cases by volume more than simplicity, then goes on to
say "if you suffer from toxicity, like many of us do." Well that is BS, only
a very few could be considered "suffering from toxicity" and it is far more
complex with all the mitigating factors. Secondly he has such a dour outlook
on recovery simply because he is a cheap Drew. He lost, he lost, he lost.
TOO Drewed bad. Had he used someone else to clean up his filthy mess all the
mold would be gone. Why, if something makes you ill would anyone proceed to
clean up a mess? If a specialist was necessary they are all over the place.
Mold and mildew is the big ongoing scam right now.
------------------------------------------------------------------

they are non-porous (they have durable, smooth surfaces)
===========================
not necessarily, a crack, gap, scratch of the smooth surface would expose
the porous underpinings.
---------------------------------------

they contain no cellulose or other organic material such as paper,
cardboard, wood, leather, cotton, wool, wall board etc.
========================================
These could, if they were truly dry, be exposed to radiation to kill the
ofenders.
---------------------------------------------------

they could be thoroughly washed in a washing machine.
================================
First line of defense in a few things.
------------------------------------------------

Such items would include glass ware, dishes, silverware, CD ROMS,
coins etc.
===============================
Providing your dishwasher was not "infected" Most dish washers are not hot
enough to kill many of the offenders and can harbor and spread spores quite
easily. Again be wary of scratches. etc.
----------------------------------------------

There are at least two important considerations when one deals with
this mold.

(1). How long do the spores remain potentially viable once they are
released from the living stachybotrys mold?

The best answer I have received regarding this is: "Stachybotrys
spores can survive for at least a year after release. However, the
viability does decline with time. The environment they are in will
affect survival and rate of decline."

Thus, any item you try to salvage can carry some spores that
potentially could germinate, under the right conditions, in your new
environment.

(2). How long do the mycotoxins on stachybotrys spores remain potent
after the spores are discharged into the air?

The best answer I have received regarding this is: "The trichothecene
toxins are very stable. Again the environment matters, if stored dry,
there is little loss of activity for a year."

Thus, if mycotoxins on the mold cause you symptoms, if you carried
some of the dead spores on the material you tried to salvage, that
material could continue to make you ill for as long as the mycotoxins
remained potent.

The answers, in quotations, were kindly provided by Mr. Stephen Vesper
of the EPA.
Finally, there is no question that Five percent sodium hypochlorite
(bleach) will kill live mold. But, that doesn't solve your problem.
You need to denature the mycotoxins on the mold spores that are on
your contaminated material. This requires a substance that can
denature the mycotoxins, while preserving the material being treated.
I haven't found the answer to this question with any degree of
reasonable certainty.
===============================================
Reading the above is certain to aid and add to confusion. There is no
certainty here, no solutions provided, just maybe's and possibilities
modified by....GOTCHA ANYHOW.

So how do you combat mis information provieded by those not educated in
these fields or specialist of propaganda?


You don't. The papers are out there to support fully what I am saying but
like the circular arguments going on in this ng shows it is a never ending
battle. The Idiots do NOT WANT a solution, they are too stupid to provide
one, too agenda oriented to see honestly, and even when the light shines
threw on rare occasions they are simply blinded and cannot deal with it. So
they revert back to their stupidity. Only a few are trolls, most are simply
people from the valley of the stupids.

Rest deleted without reading.


From: pautrey on
On Jun 15, 7:45 pm, "Peter B." <.@.> wrote:
> I sure wish that google would follow normal conventions on the Usenet and
> text posting rather than run their own Drew course.
>
> "pautrey" <rpautr...(a)gmail.com> wrote in message
>
> news:748a2511-95c1-46dd-be08-2002c6bdf40a(a)30g2000vbi.googlegroups.com...
> Excerpt From:http://www.lamold.com/ask_a_doctor.html
>
> =========================================
> Obviously the replies are not generated by an MD.
> -------------------------------------------------------------
>
> What Tests Can Be Done To Help Diagnose Stachybotrys Toxicity?
>
> No single medical test can pinpoint the level of exposure or body
> damage caused by stachybotrys. Proper medical care and professional
> decision making is necessary to assure that the affected individual is
> treated properly.
>
> Many physicians believe that the following tests are appropriate in
> conducting a medical screening for stachybotrys:
>
> Complete medical exam
>
> Chest x-ray · Pulmonary function test
>
> Complete red and white blood cell count
>
> Blood sedimentation rate
>
> Stachybotrys specific RAST antibody test
>
> Immunoglobulin panel
>
> Immune competence tests
> Doctors should be encouraged to discuss the environmental situation
> with the industrial hygiene professionals who have conducted sampling
> in the building in question etc. .
> ===================================
> This guy is all over the place and still hasn't hit all the bases.
> ----------------------------------------------------
>
> What Are The Recommendations of Doug Haney, PhD. For Toxic Testing?
> =============================================
> I don't know nut based on his writing below, if Ralph didn't mess it up, is
> a PhD not a MD.
> --------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> We have found that a blood-serum test cultured with agar agents known
> as the Multiple Antigen Simultaneous Test (MAST) CLA, Environmental
> IgG, Panel #15, conducted by Hitachi Chemical Diagnostics,®
> Incorporated of Mountain View, California, and a genetic Polymerase
> Chain Reaction (PCR) testing process conducted by ImmunoLabs,® Inc.,
> in the Los Angeles, are both very helpful in detecting fungi levels in
> the human body. There are also certain blood-serum tests available
> through blood laboratories for the Stachybotrys species. These can be
> expensive. Consult with, and work through your medical doctor if you
> are going to have them ordered.
>
> Can anything be saved? Can I save any of my family heirlooms? I have
> Stachybotrys. I lived in it for 6 months. Have left everything behind
> but wondering if I can save anything.
>
> The answer to your question is complex. It largely depends upon those
> items which you wish to save and to a lesser extent the type of
> illness the Stachybotrys is causing you. Also, there are theoretical
> considerations and considerations gained from practical experience.
>
> On a practical basis, if you are simply allergic to the mold than you
> could be more aggressive in saving items. However, if you suffer from
> toxicity, like many of us do, then it is my earnest recommendation
> that you be extremely cautious in trying to save anything or you will
> probably deeply regret it. In my experience, after disposing three
> automobiles and three houses, the only items that can be reasonably
> 'safely' retained are those that meet these requirements:
> =============================================
> This part really bothers me. He starts of with "simply allergic" as if to
> say these are minor cases by volume more than simplicity, then goes on to
> say "if you suffer from toxicity, like many of us do." Well that is BS, only
> a very few could be considered "suffering from toxicity" and it is far more
> complex with all the mitigating factors. Secondly he has such a dour outlook
> on recovery simply because he is a cheap Drew. He lost, he lost, he lost.
> TOO Drewed bad. Had he used someone else to clean up his filthy mess all the
> mold would be gone. Why, if something makes you ill would anyone proceed to
> clean up a mess? If a specialist was necessary they are all over the place.
> Mold and mildew is the big ongoing scam right now.
> ------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> they are non-porous (they have durable, smooth surfaces)
> ===========================
> not necessarily, a crack, gap, scratch of the smooth surface would expose
> the porous underpinings.
> ---------------------------------------
>
> they contain no cellulose or other organic material such as paper,
> cardboard, wood, leather, cotton, wool, wall board etc.
> ========================================
> These could, if they were truly dry, be exposed to radiation to kill the
> ofenders.
> ---------------------------------------------------
>
> they could be thoroughly washed in a washing machine.
> ================================
> First line of defense in a few things.
> ------------------------------------------------
>
> Such items would include glass ware, dishes, silverware, CD ROMS,
> coins etc.
> ===============================
> Providing your dishwasher was not "infected" Most dish washers are not hot
> enough to kill many of the offenders and can harbor and spread spores quite
> easily. Again be wary of scratches. etc.
> ----------------------------------------------
>
> There are at least two important considerations when one deals with
> this mold.
>
> (1). How long do the spores remain potentially viable once they are
> released from the living stachybotrys mold?
>
> The best answer I have received regarding this is: "Stachybotrys
> spores can survive for at least a year after release. However, the
> viability does decline with time. The environment they are in will
> affect survival and rate of decline."
>
> Thus, any item you try to salvage can carry some spores that
> potentially could germinate, under the right conditions, in your new
> environment.
>
> (2). How long do the mycotoxins on stachybotrys spores remain potent
> after the spores are discharged into the air?
>
> The best answer I have received regarding this is: "The trichothecene
> toxins are very stable. Again the environment matters, if stored dry,
> there is little loss of activity for a year."
>
> Thus, if mycotoxins on the mold cause you symptoms, if you carried
> some of the dead spores on the material you tried to salvage, that
> material could continue to make you ill for as long as the mycotoxins
> remained potent.
>
> The answers, in quotations, were kindly provided by Mr. Stephen Vesper
> of the EPA.
> Finally, there is no question that Five percent sodium hypochlorite
> (bleach) will kill live mold. But, that doesn't solve your problem.
> You need to denature the mycotoxins on the mold spores that are on
> your contaminated material. This requires a substance that can
> denature the mycotoxins, while preserving the material being treated.
> I haven't found the answer to this question with any degree of
> reasonable certainty.
> ===============================================
> Reading the above is certain to aid and add to confusion. There is no
> certainty here, no solutions provided, just maybe's and possibilities
> modified by....GOTCHA ANYHOW.
>
> So how do you combat mis information provieded by those not educated in
> these fields or specialist of propaganda?
>
> You don't. The papers are out there to support fully what I am saying but
> like the circular arguments going on in this ng shows it is a never ending
> battle. The Idiots do NOT WANT a solution, they are too stupid to provide
> one, too agenda oriented to see honestly, and even when the light shines
> threw on rare occasions they are simply blinded and cannot deal with it. So
> they revert back to their stupidity. Only a few are trolls, most are simply
> people from the valley of the stupids.
>
> Rest deleted without reading.

----------------------------------------------------------------


Yawn!
From: Peter B. on

"pautrey" <rpautrey2(a)gmail.com> wrote in message
news:ab5a9868-e89e-415d-85a1-6d781b197443(a)c33g2000yqm.googlegroups.com...

NIEHS, CDC Fund Study of Fungus Fatal to Cleveland Infants
===============================================
Maybe, they said.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
July 30, 1997
#97-12 NIEHS CONTACT:

If infant mice react like infant humans, the study may help doctors
understand, control and perhaps prevent the Stachybotrys atra-related
illness which has been serious in at least 34 infants, with bleeding
from the lungs, and caused at least ten infants to die over the past
four years in the Cleveland area alone.
==============================================
Notice the "if" word. This pitiful doc never concluded anything substantial.

It was full of maybe's and conjectures.

They, while trying to be specific, stated that this was happening only in a
certain area, yet was attributeable to a specific black mold that occurs
everywhere. No particular strain mentioned.

Anyone that has a basic understanding of sour dough starters would have
recognized that in a heartbeat.


From: Peter B. on

"pautrey" <rpautrey2(a)gmail.com> wrote in message
news:8c979aa5-c648-4daf-b477-7d2a6a547f6e(a)k39g2000yqd.googlegroups.com...


Excerpts taken from your '06 paper.
Fungi, which include yeasts, moulds, smuts and mushrooms, are
responsible for causing four types of mycotic (fungal) disease:
=============================================
Then this means you should not eat any leavened breads?

No more sourdough?

No one should ever befriend Carole since she is an obvious killer with her
yeast infections?

Blanket statements are often ridiculous.