From: pautrey on
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16835065

Environ Health Perspect. 2006 Jul;114(7):1099-107.

Satratoxin G from the black mold Stachybotrys chartarum evokes
olfactory sensory neuron loss and inflammation in the murine nose and
brain.
Islam Z, Harkema JR, Pestka JJ.

Center for Integrative Toxicology, Department of Microbiology and
Molecular Genetics, and Department of Food Science and Human
Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA.

Abstract
Satratoxin G (SG) is a macrocyclic trichothecene mycotoxin produced by
Stachybotrys chartarum, the "black mold" suggested to contribute
etiologically to illnesses associated with water-damaged buildings.
Using an intranasal instillation model in mice, we found that acute SG
exposure specifically induced apoptosis of olfactory sensory neurons
(OSNs) in the olfactory epithelium. Dose-response analysis revealed
that the no-effect and lowest-effect levels at 24 hr postinstillation
(PI) were 5 and 25 microg/kg body weight (bw) SG, respectively, with
severity increasing with dose. Apoptosis of OSNs was identified using
immunohistochemistry for caspase-3 expression, electron microscopy for
ultrastructural cellular morphology, and real-time polymerase chain
reaction for elevated expression of the proapoptotic genes Fas, FasL,
p75NGFR, p53, Bax, caspase-3, and CAD. Time-course studies with a
single instillation of SG (500 microg/kg bw) indicated that maximum
atrophy of the olfactory epithelium occurred at 3 days PI. Exposure to
lower doses (100 microg/kg bw) for 5 consecutive days resulted in
similar atrophy and apoptosis, suggesting that in the short term,
these effects are cumulative. SG also induced an acute, neutrophilic
rhinitis as early as 24 hr PI. Elevated mRNA expression for the
proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6
(IL-6) , and IL-1 and the chemokine macrophage-inflammatory protein-2
(MIP-2) were detected at 24 hr PI in both the ethmoid turbinates of
the nasal airways and the adjacent olfactory bulb of the brain. Marked
atrophy of the olfactory nerve and glomerular layers of the olfactory
bulb was also detectable by 7 days PI along with mild neutrophilic
encephalitis. These findings suggest that neurotoxicity and
inflammation within the nose and brain are potential adverse health
effects of exposure to satratoxins and Stachybotrys in the indoor air
of water-damaged buildings.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16835065







On Jun 17, 12:04 pm, "Peter B." <.@.> wrote:
> "pautrey" <rpautr...(a)gmail.com> wrote in message
>
> news:8c979aa5-c648-4daf-b477-7d2a6a547f6e(a)k39g2000yqd.googlegroups.com...
>
> Excerpts taken from your '06 paper.
> Fungi, which include yeasts, moulds, smuts and mushrooms, are
> responsible for causing four types of mycotic (fungal) disease:
> =============================================
> Then this means you should not eat any leavened breads?
>
> No more sourdough?
>
> No one should ever befriend Carole since she is an obvious killer with her
> yeast infections?
>
> Blanket statements are often ridiculous.

From: Peter B. on

"pautrey" <rpautrey2(a)gmail.com> wrote in message
news:41cbd1ab-3c7a-42d1-ac82-0a3088ed4c75(a)w31g2000yqb.googlegroups.com...
On Jun 17, 12:04 pm, "Peter B." <.@.> wrote:
> "pautrey" <rpautr...(a)gmail.com> wrote in message
>
> news:8c979aa5-c648-4daf-b477-7d2a6a547f6e(a)k39g2000yqd.googlegroups.com...
>
> Excerpts taken from your '06 paper.
> Fungi, which include yeasts, moulds, smuts and mushrooms, are
> responsible for causing four types of mycotic (fungal) disease:
> =============================================
> Then this means you should not eat any leavened breads?
>
> No more sourdough?
>
> No one should ever befriend Carole since she is an obvious killer with her
> yeast infections?
>
> Blanket statements are often ridiculous.


From: Peter B. on
"pautrey" <rpautrey2(a)gmail.com> wrote in message
news:551c23b8-fc28-49a5-8349-54f80035571e(a)k39g2000yqb.googlegroups.com...
>
>
> Toxic Mold and their Mycotoxins in our
> Homes, Workplaces and Schools
>
>
> Linked to
>
>
> Aging
>
> Degenerative Diseases
>
> Alcoholism
>
> Family Disruption
>
> Domestic Abuse and Violence
>
> Other Health and Social Issues
>

Do allow me to add to your concerns. Anytime breads, rolls, biscuits, cakes,
cupcakes and so on, but especially in the bread family, is made at home it
absorbs all the molds and yeastie's floating about in the air and regenerate
in the product.

This is a well known fact and although many housewives know what is going on
they never have put two and two together. Those who make starters will
gather the most out of the air. (They know who they are) all foods left to
cool on a table collect these same molds, spores, yeasts.

Ever since the time that mankind has lived in a dwelling and started making
their own food stuffs this has been going on.

So from that you can gather that it is

1. no big deal and has been going on for eons of times.

or

2. Convince yourself that they have developed into super bugs and they are
all now well known killers.
This also takes place anytime anywhere that food is prepared.

So...............

The only recourse is to stop eating to live or part hearty and die.


From: pautrey on

Excerpt From:
http://www.vdem.state.va.us/threats/terrorism/toolkit/terrguide/weapons/toxins.htm#Mycotoxins



Mycotoxins
Description
Q: What are mycotoxins?
A: They are naturally occurring poisonous compounds produced by
various fungi.


Q: Where are mycotoxins found?
A: Mycotoxins are compounds produced by fungi, or molds, which co-
exist with various plants. For example, a group of approximately 40
mycotoxin compounds are produced by mold that grows on grain (genus
Fusarium).


Q: Can I die from exposure to mycotoxins?
A: Yes. The fatality rate is considered moderate.


Transmission
Q: How is one exposed to mycotoxins?
A: Mycotoxins can enter the body through the skin, eyes or respiratory
and digestive tracts.


Q: Can the toxins be spread from one person to another?
A: No, there is no person-to-person transmission.


Q: Can mycotoxins be released in the air?
A: Yes.

Symptoms
Q: What are the symptoms of mycotoxin poisoning?
A: Early symptoms, beginning within moments of exposure, include
burning skin pain, redness, tenderness, blistering, and progression to
skin necrosis (death of cells) with leathery blackening and sloughing
of large areas of skin in lethal cases.


When inhaled, symptoms include nose and throat pain, nasal discharge,
itching and sneezing, cough, wheezing, difficult breathing, chest pain
and bloody sputum.

Following ingestion, symptoms include nausea, vomiting, and watery or
bloody diarrhea with abdominal pain.

Symptoms of eye contact with mycotoxins include tearing, pain,
redness, foreign body sensation and blurred vision.

Severe poisoning results in weakness, loss of muscle coordination,
collapse, shock and death. Death may occur in minutes, hours or days.

Q: How soon following exposure to mycotoxins will symptoms show up?
A: Skin symptoms appear in minutes to hours. Eye symptoms appear
minutes following exposure. Death can occur in minutes, hours or days.


Treatment
Q: Is there any treatment for mycotoxin poisoning?
A: There is no specific antidote for mycotoxins.


Super activated charcoal can be given orally if the toxin is
ingested.

Eyes can be irrigated with saline solution or water to remove toxin.

The skin should be thoroughly washed with soap and uncontaminated
water.

The only other treatment is supportive.

Q: Is there a vaccine for mycotoxins?
A: No.


Decontamination
Q: If I suspect my home was exposed to mycotoxins how can I
decontaminate it?
A: Take the following steps:

Contaminated objects or surfaces should be cleaned with a bleach
solution if they can't be avoided for the hours or days needed for
natural degradation.

Mycotoxins are extremely stable in heat and ultraviolet light
(sunlight).

Bioterrorist Threat
Q: Have mycotoxins been developed for use as a weapon?
A: Mycotoxins were allegedly used in aerosol form to produce lethal
and non-lethal casualties in Laos in 1975-81, Kampuchea in 1979-81 and
Afghanistan in 1979-81. It is estimated there were more than 6,300
deaths in Laos, 1,000 in Kampuchea and 3,042 in Afghanistan. These
releases were known as "yellow rain" and because of the remote
locations were never accurately documented.


Q: Are mycotoxins a major bio-weapons threat?
A: Although they have been used as bio-weapons, they are not
considered to have major bio-weaponry potential because of the large
quantity of toxin required for lethal potency. However, they are very
easy to produce.


Q: How could a deliberate aerosol release of mycotoxins be identified?
A: A deliberate release could be identified as follows:

A rapid onset of symptoms within minutes to hours would result from a
deliberate mycotoxin aerosol release.

A release would be suspected if droplets of yellow fluid (yellow rain)
contaminate clothing or the environment.

Mycotoxins are one of the few bio-weapons to affect the skin in a
manner similar to mustard (a chemical agent). However, a mycotoxin
release would differ from a release of mustard because there would be
no odor, and eye and skin symptoms would appear quickly.

Read More:
http://www.vdem.state.va.us/threats/terrorism/toolkit/terrguide/weapons/toxins.htm#Mycotoxins
From: Peter B. on
Have you modified some of this, your post includes things that simply are
incorrect.

"pautrey" <rpautrey2(a)gmail.com> wrote in message
news:96d2263a-4d0f-4f1b-a59a-35e08b8ed466(a)i28g2000yqa.googlegroups.com...
>
> Excerpt From:
> http://www.vdem.state.va.us/threats/terrorism/toolkit/terrguide/weapons/toxins.htm#Mycotoxins
>
>
>
> Mycotoxins
> Description
> Q: What are mycotoxins?
> A: They are naturally occurring poisonous compounds produced by
> various fungi.
>
>
> Q: Where are mycotoxins found?
> A: Mycotoxins are compounds produced by fungi, or molds, which co-
> exist with various plants. For example, a group of approximately 40
> mycotoxin compounds are produced by mold that grows on grain (genus
> Fusarium).
>
>
> Q: Can I die from exposure to mycotoxins?
> A: Yes. The fatality rate is considered moderate.
>
>
> Transmission
> Q: How is one exposed to mycotoxins?
> A: Mycotoxins can enter the body through the skin, eyes or respiratory
> and digestive tracts.
>
>
> Q: Can the toxins be spread from one person to another?
> A: No, there is no person-to-person transmission.
>
>
> Q: Can mycotoxins be released in the air?
> A: Yes.
>
> Symptoms
> Q: What are the symptoms of mycotoxin poisoning?
> A: Early symptoms, beginning within moments of exposure, include
> burning skin pain, redness, tenderness, blistering, and progression to
> skin necrosis (death of cells) with leathery blackening and sloughing
> of large areas of skin in lethal cases.
>
>
> When inhaled, symptoms include nose and throat pain, nasal discharge,
> itching and sneezing, cough, wheezing, difficult breathing, chest pain
> and bloody sputum.
>
> Following ingestion, symptoms include nausea, vomiting, and watery or
> bloody diarrhea with abdominal pain.
>
> Symptoms of eye contact with mycotoxins include tearing, pain,
> redness, foreign body sensation and blurred vision.
>
> Severe poisoning results in weakness, loss of muscle coordination,
> collapse, shock and death. Death may occur in minutes, hours or days.
>
> Q: How soon following exposure to mycotoxins will symptoms show up?
> A: Skin symptoms appear in minutes to hours. Eye symptoms appear
> minutes following exposure. Death can occur in minutes, hours or days.
>
>
> Treatment
> Q: Is there any treatment for mycotoxin poisoning?
> A: There is no specific antidote for mycotoxins.
>
>
> Super activated charcoal can be given orally if the toxin is
> ingested.
>
> Eyes can be irrigated with saline solution or water to remove toxin.
>
> The skin should be thoroughly washed with soap and uncontaminated
> water.
>
> The only other treatment is supportive.
>

Mycotoxins can appear in the food chain as a result of fungal infection of
crops, either by being eaten directly by humans, or by being used as
livestock feed. Mycotoxins greatly resist decomposition or being broken down
in digestion, so they remain in the food chain in meat and dairy products.
Even temperature treatments, such as cooking and freezing, do not destroy
mycotoxins, Wickedpedia.

You also appear to be quoting a site for weaponized mycotoxins which
intensifies by huge magnitudes the severity, including penetrating the skin
so it cannot be simply washed off.




> Q: Is there a vaccine for mycotoxins?
> A: No.
>
>
> Decontamination
> Q: If I suspect my home was exposed to mycotoxins how can I
> decontaminate it?
> A: Take the following steps:
>
> Contaminated objects or surfaces should be cleaned with a bleach
> solution if they can't be avoided for the hours or days needed for
> natural degradation.
>
> Mycotoxins are extremely stable in heat and ultraviolet light
> (sunlight).
>
> Bioterrorist Threat
> Q: Have mycotoxins been developed for use as a weapon?
> A: Mycotoxins were allegedly used in aerosol form to produce lethal
> and non-lethal casualties in Laos in 1975-81, Kampuchea in 1979-81 and
> Afghanistan in 1979-81. It is estimated there were more than 6,300
> deaths in Laos, 1,000 in Kampuchea and 3,042 in Afghanistan. These
> releases were known as "yellow rain" and because of the remote
> locations were never accurately documented.
>
>
> Q: Are mycotoxins a major bio-weapons threat?
> A: Although they have been used as bio-weapons, they are not
> considered to have major bio-weaponry potential because of the large
> quantity of toxin required for lethal potency. However, they are very
> easy to produce.
>
>
> Q: How could a deliberate aerosol release of mycotoxins be identified?
> A: A deliberate release could be identified as follows:
>
> A rapid onset of symptoms within minutes to hours would result from a
> deliberate mycotoxin aerosol release.
>
> A release would be suspected if droplets of yellow fluid (yellow rain)
> contaminate clothing or the environment.
>
> Mycotoxins are one of the few bio-weapons to affect the skin in a
> manner similar to mustard (a chemical agent). However, a mycotoxin
> release would differ from a release of mustard because there would be
> no odor, and eye and skin symptoms would appear quickly.
>

Give me a break, it could be pink, green, blue whateve is desired. A rapid
onset of conditions can occur within minutes, naturally. It appears someone
is blowing smoke here, doing a lot of conjecture and mixing and matching
according to whim and fear factor.

> Read More:
> http://www.vdem.state.va.us/threats/terrorism/toolkit/terrguide/weapons/toxins.htm#Mycotoxins