From: Tim Campbell on
On Feb 2, 7:07 pm, Mark Probert <mark.prob...(a)gmail.com> wrote:

>
> "Working" for self limiting conditions is pure speculation.

Yes, a speculation that had the fruit of being healing...

From: Tim Campbell on
On Feb 2, 7:07 pm, Mark Probert <mark.prob...(a)gmail.com> wrote:

>
> "Working" for self limiting conditions is pure speculation.

As you tremble behind your walls of rationality just know that it it
is not as dangerous out here in the empirical world as you fear.

From: dr_jeff on
Tim Campbell wrote:
> On Feb 2, 5:29 pm, dr_jeff <u...(a)msu.edu> wrote:
>
>> Or, in both cases, both of you got better on your own and would have
>> improved at the same rate without the bicarb.
>
> Your evidence for this supposition?

It's called the placebo effect.
From: Tim Campbell on
On Feb 4, 5:33 am, dr_jeff <u...(a)msu.edu> wrote:

>
> It's called the placebo effect.

Bottom line, placebo effect or not; I tried what Arm & Hammer
suggested and
it worked. And I know of others who are experiencing the same effect
from baking soda.
Strange sort of mass delusion apparently.:^)
From: Mark Probert on
On Jan 31, 6:59 pm, Tim Campbell <timc...(a)sbcglobal.net> wrote:
> On Jan 30, 6:51 pm, Mark Probert <mark.prob...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>
> >http://scienceblogs.com/insolence/2009/12/arm_hammer_baking_soda_for_...
>
> Mark, the next time you get a cold try bicarbonate. You'll be
> convinced.  (...and probably a little embarrassed.)

I do not get colds. I have not had one in well over ten years, and
that was the last time I did not get a seasonal flu vaccine.