From: trigonometry1972 on
On May 26, 5:42 pm, Mark Probert <mark.prob...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
> On May 26, 8:08 pm, Mark Probert <mark.prob...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>
> >http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/26/health/policy/26herbal.html
>
> > Nearly all of the herbal dietary supplements tested in a Congressional
> > investigation contained trace amounts of lead and other contaminants,
> > and some supplement sellers made illegal claims that their products
> > can cure cancer and other diseases, investigators found.
>
> > The levels of heavy metals — including mercury, cadmium and arsenic —
> > did not exceed thresholds considered dangerous, the investigators
> > found. However, 16 of the 40 supplements tested contained pesticide
> > residues that appeared to exceed legal limits, the investigators
> > found. In some cases, the government has not set allowable levels of
> > these pesticides because of a paucity of scientific research.



This is almost certainly true of many imported food related
substances form China and India. Recall this is contamination
of milk bearing foods from China just a couple of years ago
which made it into a host of human and animal foods in
China and here in the States.

One had got to love the free market and free trade.......lol.

Good manufacturing practices would be good but too often
it is just a means to other ends.

Nor should we ignore the contamination of certain prescription
drugs with phthalates all the the approval of the US FDA.

Clearly we need someone to watch the supposed watcher.

Nor should we forget the embrace of high fructose corn
syrup and sucrose by certain supposed advocates for the public
welfare...............lol. No matter it set the stage for
the obesity epidemic. Yes, Ready Freddy Stare the "foremost
nutritionist" of his generation embraced sucrose and condemned
fats. "Received" authority can be deadly both directly and
indirectly.

Trig
From: pautrey on
On May 26, 7:08 pm, Mark Probert <mark.prob...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
> http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/26/health/policy/26herbal.html
>
> Nearly all of the herbal dietary supplements tested in a Congressional
> investigation contained trace amounts of lead and other contaminants,
> and some supplement sellers made illegal claims that their products
> can cure cancer and other diseases, investigators found.
>
> The levels of heavy metals — including mercury, cadmium and arsenic —
> did not exceed thresholds considered dangerous, the investigators
> found. However, 16 of the 40 supplements tested contained pesticide
> residues that appeared to exceed legal limits, the investigators
> found. In some cases, the government has not set allowable levels of
> these pesticides because of a paucity of scientific research.

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"In recent years, a vast majority of supplement suppliers have located
overseas — principally in China."
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/26/health/policy/26herbal.html