From: Mark Probert-Drew on
On May 23, 8:09 am, Peter Bowditch <myfirstn...(a)ratbags.com> wrote:
> Jan Drew <jdrew63...(a)aol.com> wrote:
> > .
>
> That must be why I'm so dead. I've held mercury in my hand countless
> times - when I was at the dentist as a child, while doing chemistry at
> high school, ...
>
> Making stupid statements like "A single drop on a human hand can be
> irreversibly fatal" just illustrates how weak the argument against
> mercury is.

I was thinking about that. Perhaps a half-drop can be reversibly
fatal?

From: Peter B. on

"Mark Probert-Drew" <mark.probert(a)gmail.com> wrote in message
news:c5d20a48-fbb7-485b-81a0-a99448202191(a)u7g2000vbq.googlegroups.com...
On May 23, 8:09 am, Peter Bowditch <myfirstn...(a)ratbags.com> wrote:
> Jan Drew <jdrew63...(a)aol.com> wrote:
> > .
>
> That must be why I'm so dead. I've held mercury in my hand countless
> times - when I was at the dentist as a child, while doing chemistry at
> high school, ...
>
> Making stupid statements like "A single drop on a human hand can be
> irreversibly fatal" just illustrates how weak the argument against
> mercury is.

I was thinking about that. Perhaps a half-drop can be reversibly
fatal?
===============================================
Nah, with Mercury there are only drops, no halfsies. I'm still waiting for
her to drop dead from the merc in her mouth or the miniscule amt that is in
her gold jewelry, you know.....the stuff she bought from JEWelers? LOL.


From: Jan on
On May 22, 9:52 pm, Mark Probert-Drew <mark.prob...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
> On May 22, 8:59 pm, Jan Drew <jdrew63...(a)aol.com> wrote:
>
> >http://discovermagazine.com/2005/mar/our-preferred-poison
>
> > Let’s start with a straightforward fact:
>
> > Mercury is unimaginably toxic and dangerous.
>
> I can imagine it.
>
> > A single drop on a human hand can be irreversibly fatal.
>
> Hogwash. As a kid, I used to get some from my dentist and play with
> it.

***In August 1996 Karen Wetterhahn, a chemistry professor at
Dartmouth
College in Hanover, New Hampshire, spilled a few drops of a
laboratory
compound called dimethyl mercury onto one of her hands. She was
wearing latex lab gloves, so she didn’t think much of it. A colleague
saw her at a conference the following November. “She said she thought
she was coming down with the flu,” says toxicologist Vas Aposhian of
the University of Arizona. By the time Wetterhahn was diagnosed with
mercury poisoning, in January, it was too late. Despite subsequent
treatment that helped clear the metal from her body, she lapsed into
a
vegetative state in February and died the following June. ***

From: Jan on
On May 22, 11:06 pm, Steven Bornfeld <dentaltwinm...(a)earthlink.net>
wrote:
> Mark Probert-Drew wrote:
>
> > Hogwash. As a kid, I used to get some from my dentist and play with
> > it.
>
>         I did too.  I wouldn't recommend it as an activity to my daughter though.
>
>
>
> > I have lived to an age which Jan Drool cannot even calculate. Call me
> > Methusallah.
>
>         I genuflect in your general direction.
>
> Steve

Shame on you, Steve. This is a serious matter.
You used to be a gentleman, what happened?

***In August 1996 Karen Wetterhahn, a chemistry professor at
Dartmouth
College in Hanover, New Hampshire, spilled a few drops of a
laboratory
compound called dimethyl mercury onto one of her hands. She was
wearing latex lab gloves, so she didn’t think much of it. A colleague
saw her at a conference the following November. “She said she thought
she was coming down with the flu,” says toxicologist Vas Aposhian of
the University of Arizona. By the time Wetterhahn was diagnosed with
mercury poisoning, in January, it was too late. Despite subsequent
treatment that helped clear the metal from her body, she lapsed into
a
vegetative state in February and died the following June.***


From: Jan on
On May 23, 8:09 am, Peter Bowditch <myfirstn...(a)ratbags.com> wrote:

[ ]

> Jan Drew <jdrew63...(a)aol.com> wrote:


***In August 1996 Karen Wetterhahn, a chemistry professor at
Dartmouth
College in Hanover, New Hampshire, spilled a few drops of a
laboratory
compound called dimethyl mercury onto one of her hands. She was
wearing latex lab gloves, so she didn’t think much of it. A colleague
saw her at a conference the following November. “She said she thought
she was coming down with the flu,” says toxicologist Vas Aposhian of
the University of Arizona. By the time Wetterhahn was diagnosed with
mercury poisoning, in January, it was too late. Despite subsequent
treatment that helped clear the metal from her body, she lapsed into
a
vegetative state in February and died the following June.***


http://dujs.dartmouth.edu/spring-2008-10th-anniversary-edition/remembering-karen-wetterhahn

http://collaborations.denison.edu/naosmm/topics/dartmouth.html

http://www.niehs.nih.gov/research/supported/srp/training/training6.cfm
> --
> Peter Bowditch