From: pautrey on
New finding could yield urine test for autism
(AFP) – 1 day ago

PARIS — A newly discovered chemical fingerprint could yield a simple
urine test to determine if a child has autism, according to a study
released on Thursday.

Autism and related disorders affect up to six or seven out of every
1,000 individuals.

Symptoms are life-long and can vary widely, but often include impaired
social skills, repetitive behaviours, difficulty in expressing one's
emotions, and an aversion to physical intimacy. There is no known
cure.

The factors leading to autism are generally present at birth, but the
disorder is difficult to diagnose as it can be confused with other
behaviour-related problems.

At present, children are assessed through a lengthy process that tests
social interaction, communication and imaginative skills.

A confirmed diagnosis is rare before the age of 18 months, and most
often occurs much later.

A chemical marker would allow early diagnosis and could prove hugely
helpful in getting a head start on treatment, the researchers said.

"Giving therapy to children with autism when they are very young can
make a huge difference to their progress," said lead researcher Jeremy
Nicholson, a professor at Imperial College London.

"A urine test might enable professionals to quickly identify children
with autism to help them early on," he said in a statement.

Such a test, he cautioned, would probably take several years to
develop.

Surprisingly, the key to the chemical fingerprint is found in the
digestive tract.

People with autism typically suffer from gastrointestinal problems
stemming from a different bacterial makeup in the gut.

The study, published in the Journal of Proteome Research, found that
the way in which the body metabolises these unique intestinal flora
creates a chemical signature in urine.

Read More:
http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5i4DHUTGrsMMV0-CIrS0OVMHKe38A
From: pautrey on
On Jun 4, 2:39 pm, pautrey <rpautr...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
> New finding could yield urine test for autism
> (AFP) – 1 day ago
>
> PARIS — A newly discovered chemical fingerprint could yield a simple
> urine test to determine if a child has autism, according to a study
> released on Thursday.
>
> Autism and related disorders affect up to six or seven out of every
> 1,000 individuals.
>
> Symptoms are life-long and can vary widely, but often include impaired
> social skills, repetitive behaviours, difficulty in expressing one's
> emotions, and an aversion to physical intimacy. There is no known
> cure.
>
> The factors leading to autism are generally present at birth, but the
> disorder is difficult to diagnose as it can be confused with other
> behaviour-related problems.
>
> At present, children are assessed through a lengthy process that tests
> social interaction, communication and imaginative skills.
>
> A confirmed diagnosis is rare before the age of 18 months, and most
> often occurs much later.
>
> A chemical marker would allow early diagnosis and could prove hugely
> helpful in getting a head start on treatment, the researchers said.
>
> "Giving therapy to children with autism when they are very young can
> make a huge difference to their progress," said lead researcher Jeremy
> Nicholson, a professor at Imperial College London.
>
> "A urine test might enable professionals to quickly identify children
> with autism to help them early on," he said in a statement.
>
> Such a test, he cautioned, would probably take several years to
> develop.
>
> Surprisingly, the key to the chemical fingerprint is found in the
> digestive tract.
>
> People with autism typically suffer from gastrointestinal problems
> stemming from a different bacterial makeup in the gut.
>
> The study, published in the Journal of Proteome Research, found that
> the way in which the body metabolises these unique intestinal flora
> creates a chemical signature in urine.
>
> Read More:http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5i4DHUTGrsMMV0-CIrS...

Research may yield new urine test to diagnose autism
3. June 2010 07:20


Children with autism have a different chemical fingerprint in their
urine than non-autistic children, according to new research published
tomorrow in the print edition of the Journal of Proteome Research.

The researchers behind the study, from Imperial College London and the
University of South Australia, suggest that their findings could
ultimately lead to a simple urine test to determine whether or not a
young child has autism.

Autism affects an estimated one in every 100 people in the UK. People
with autism have a range of different symptoms, but they commonly
experience problems with communication and social skills, such as
understanding other people's emotions and making conversation and eye
contact.

People with autism are also known to suffer from gastrointestinal
disorders and they have a different makeup of bacteria in their guts
from non-autistic people.

Today's research shows that it is possible to distinguish between
autistic and non-autistic children by looking at the by-products of
gut bacteria and the body's metabolic processes in the children's
urine. The exact biological significance of gastrointestinal disorders
in the development of autism is unknown.

The distinctive urinary metabolic fingerprint for autism identified in
today's study could form the basis of a non-invasive test that might
help diagnose autism earlier. This would enable autistic children to
receive assistance, such as advanced behavioural therapy, earlier in
their development than is currently possible.


Read More:
http://www.news-medical.net/news/20100603/Research-may-yield-new-urine-test-to-diagnose-autism.aspx