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From: bizby40 on

"Chookie" <ehrebeniuk(a)fowlspambegone.com.au> wrote in message
news:ehrebeniuk-7EC4D6.17564209122006(a)news-vip.optusnet.com.au...
> I hope "do the zip line" isn't as rude as it sounds! Translation?

:-) A "zip line" is a metal cable suspended between 2 trees or posts
on a downward slope. You hang from a handle and "zip" down the slope
at what can be dizzying speeds.

This website contains a video of a zipline in action.

http://www.outdoorfunstore.com/zipline.asp

Bizby


From: Jen on

"bizby40" <bizby40(a)adelphia.net> wrote in message
news:aNGdnaTYZ8OZNOfYnZ2dnUVZ_u-unZ2d(a)adelphia.com...
>
> "Chookie" <ehrebeniuk(a)fowlspambegone.com.au> wrote in message
> news:ehrebeniuk-7EC4D6.17564209122006(a)news-vip.optusnet.com.au...
>> I hope "do the zip line" isn't as rude as it sounds! Translation?
>
> :-) A "zip line" is a metal cable suspended between 2 trees or posts on a
> downward slope. You hang from a handle and "zip" down the slope at what
> can be dizzying speeds.
>
> This website contains a video of a zipline in action.
>
> http://www.outdoorfunstore.com/zipline.asp


We call that a flying fox.


Jen


From: Chookie on
In article <pEGeh.5368$HU.443(a)news-server.bigpond.net.au>,
"Jen" <anyofusNo(a)SPAMbigpond.net.au> wrote:

> >> I hope "do the zip line" isn't as rude as it sounds! Translation?
> >
> > :-) A "zip line" is a metal cable suspended between 2 trees or posts on a
> > downward slope. You hang from a handle and "zip" down the slope at what
> > can be dizzying speeds.
>
> We call that a flying fox.

And I'd refuse to go on one as well!

--
Chookie -- Sydney, Australia
(Replace "foulspambegone" with "optushome" to reply)

"Parenthood is like the modern stone washing process for denim jeans. You may
start out crisp, neat and tough, but you end up pale, limp and wrinkled."
Kerry Cue
From: Ericka Kammerer on
Chookie wrote:
> In article <lZudne01vrHuP-TYnZ2dnUVZ_uiknZ2d(a)comcast.com>,
> Ericka Kammerer <eek(a)comcast.net> wrote:
>
>>> OK -- so a Pause occurs when the child has given up resisting. The obvious
>>> question is: what if they don't?
>> No, the pause is the period of time where the
>> child is getting himself under control. It *ends* when
>> he is quiet and attentive.
>> The idea is that the SPR continues until they
>> *do* achieve that state. You keep stopping and parking
>> until they do.
>
> This is the bit I'm not quite sure of. Why do you have to KEEP doing it? You
> stop them, they stop struggling (eventually!), calm down, and become quiet and
> attentive. Then you ask, "Are you ready to set the table?" Do they then lie
> to you, or is it that they aren't truly calm and attentive, so that you have
> to Stop them again?

The question is whether they actually become calm and
attentive. If you let go and they race off again, they they
never successfully paused, even if they stopped struggling
while you were holding them. That's just a tactic to get
you to let go so they can be off again. If you let go and
they are doing what you told them to do (e.g., if they're
supposed to be parked standing next to you, and you let go
and they're standing quietly next to you), then fine.

>> The manipulation
>> that anxious kids employ in order to control their
>> world so that they don't have to face situations that
>> concern them is more subtle and parents often
>> think something else is going on and basically coddle
>> the kid, enabling them to continue to avoid things
>> that concern them.
>
> What sort of things did you avoid as a kid? I couldn't work out how to avoid
> maths or PE!

Well, I didn't worry about avoiding anything academic,
as those were strengths for me. In PE, I'd do my best to choose
activities that I was better at. I never chose to do any sports
I wasn't going to be decent at. I never chose to do any sort
of artwork that I didn't think I'd be decent at.

Best wishes,
Ericka
From: Ericka Kammerer on
Chookie wrote:
> In article <jeOdnbftPLffO-TYnZ2dnUVZ_sKunZ2d(a)comcast.com>,
> Ericka Kammerer <eek(a)comcast.net> wrote:
>
>>> If a child is coasting at school, they
>>> don't have to make an effort, so they start to think that having
>>> difficulties is abnormal.
>> I think this is absolutely true, but it can start
>> even younger. DS1 showed all these signs by the time
>> he was only a year old!
>
> Oh yes -- I just used a school example as that's easy to understand. Did your
> DS not get up and awlk until he was sure he could do it?!

Nope. And he didn't talk until he could say words
clearly. He'd practice saying his alphabet or counting
alone in his room when he thought we couldn't hear him.
He was still walking and talking at a year old, but he
didn't go through a lot of practice.

Best wishes,
Ericka

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