From: Tim Campbell on
Press Releases
For Embargoed Release
April 24, 2007 Mount Sinai Press Office
Tel: (212) 241-9200
E-mail: NewsMedia(a)mssm.edu

Study Shows Food Preparation May Play a Bigger Role in Chronic Disease
than was Previously Thought


How your food is cooked may be as important to your health as the food
itself. Researchers now know more about a new class of toxins that
might soon become as important a risk factor for heart disease and
metabolic disorders as trans fats.

This class of toxins, called advanced glycation end products (AGEs),
are absorbed into the body through the consumption of grilled, fried,
or broiled animal products, such as meats and cheeses. AGEs, which are
also produced when food products are sterilized and pasteurized, have
been linked to inflammation, insulin resistance, diabetes, vascular
and kidney disease, and Alzheimer's disease.

A new study at Mount Sinai School of Medicine reveals that AGE levels
are elevated in the blood of healthy people, and even more so in older
individuals than in younger people. Of particular interest was the
finding that a major determinant of the blood levels of AGEs is the
amount of AGEs in the diet, not dietary calories, sugar, or fat. The
study, which was done in collaboration with, and supported by, the
National Institute on Aging ( NIA), is published in the April issue of
the Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences.
"AGEs are quite deceptive, since they also give our food desirable
tastes and smells," says Helen Vlassara, MD, senior study author,
Director of the Division of Experimental Diabetes and Aging, and
Professor of Medicine and Geriatrics at Mount Sinai School of
Medicine. "So, consuming high amounts of grilled, broiled, or fried
food means consuming significant amounts of AGEs, and AGEs in excess
are toxic. People should be given information about their AGE intake
and be advised to consider their intake in the same way they would
think about their trans fats and salt intake. They should be warned
about their AGE levels the way they are about their cholesterol levels
or cigarette smoking."
Inflammation and oxidative stress are more common in older age, so the
goal of the study was to assess whether AGEs played a significant role
in age-related inflammation and oxidative stress by measuring AGE
levels in both young and older individuals. The study involved 172
healthy men and women who were divided into two age groups-those
between the ages of 18 and 45 and those between the ages of 60 and 80.
Dr. Vlassara and her team also wanted to assess whether AGE levels
correlated with dietary intake. To do this, her team recorded the
patient's body weight, body fat, three-day dietary information, and
collected blood samples to measure biomarkers of inflammation, such as
C-reactive protein (CRP). Blood samples were used to test for two
common AGEs, called carboxymethyllysine (CML) and methylglyoxal (MG),
which latch on to proteins and fats.
The blood tests showed that AGE levels were 35 percent higher in
individuals age 65 and older compared with those younger than age 45.
The study also showed that in all of the participants, the higher the
consumption of foods rich in AGEs, the higher the blood levels of
AGEs, and higher the levels of CRP and other markers of inflammation.

Much to the researchers' surprise, the study also showed that AGE
levels could be very high in young healthy people. In fact, high AGE
levels found in some healthy adults in this study were on par with AGE
levels observed in diabetic patients in their earlier studies. The
fact that healthy adults had levels similar to those seen in diabetic
patients may suggest that early and prolonged exposure to these
substances in the diet could accelerate the onset of diseases. Dr.
Vlassara notes that the availability and consumption of AGE-rich foods
is high and correlates with rising rates of diabetes and heart
disease.

"Excessive intake of fried, broiled, and grilled foods can overload
the body's natural capacity to remove AGEs," Dr. Vlassara notes, "so
they accumulate in our tissues, and take over the body's own built-in
defenses, pushing them toward a state of inflammation. Over time, this
can precipitate disease or early aging." Once AGEs enter the body, it
becomes more difficult to get them out, especially as people age.
Older people have a reduced capacity for removing AGEs from the body,
the researchers explain, most likely because kidney function slows
down as the body ages.

As Dr. Vlassara cautions,"although the accumulation of AGEs pose an
immediate and significant health threat to the older adult population,
they are also an invisible, lingering danger especially for younger
people and this needs to be addressed. AGE levels should be shown on
nutrition labels so everyone is aware of them when buying or preparing
meals - and our studies explain why."

A Simple Solution: Steam, Boil, Stew

Despite the ubiquity of AGEs, Dr. Vlassara and her team offer simple,
safe, and economic solutions that echo the recommendations given
concerning trans fats-watch what you eat. New methods of cooking to
reduce AGE intake, particularly steaming, boiling or making stews, can
make a difference. "Keeping the heat down and maintaining the water
content in food reduces AGE levels," Dr. Vlassara says. A 50 percent
reduction in AGE intake could have a significant and positive impact
on overall health and may even help extend one's lifespan, according
to Dr. Vlassara. In other studies, the team has found that cutting AGE
intake in half, but maintaining a diet comprised of the same calories
and fat, increased the lifespan of animals when compared with animals
fed their usual diet.
At the moment, changing one's approaches to cooking is the only
defense against excessive AGE consumption. There is no routine
clinical test to inform individuals of their blood or dietary AGE
levels nor established treatment to reduce high AGE blood levels. "The
concept that food-related AGE intake is harmful is new to the general
public," says Dr. Vlassara, "and scientists are now seeing how AGE
intake fits with the current trends of disease epidemics. Hopefully,
these wake-up signals, together with other gathering evidence at the
cellular and molecular level, will accelerate our efforts to develop
effective measures against excessive dietary AGEs. This issue,
however, should be dealt with as an important health hazard now,
rather than later."
About The Mount Sinai Medical Center

The Mount Sinai Medical Center encompasses The Mount Sinai Hospital
and Mount Sinai School of Medicine. The Mount Sinai Hospital is one of
the nation's oldest, largest and most-respected voluntary hospitals.
Founded in 1852, Mount Sinai today is a 1,171-bed tertiary-care
teaching facility that is internationally acclaimed for excellence in
clinical care. Last year, nearly 50,000 people were treated at Mount
Sinai as inpatients, and there were nearly 450,000 outpatient visits
to the Medical Center .

Mount Sinai School of Medicine is internationally recognized as a
leader in groundbreaking clinical and basic-science research, as well
as having an innovative approach to medical education. With a faculty
of more than 3,400 in 38 clinical and basic science departments and
centers, Mount Sinai ranks among the top 20 medical schools in receipt
of National Institute of Health (NIH) grants.

From: Paul Antonik Wakfer on

Tim Campbell wrote:
> Press Releases
> For Embargoed Release
> April 24, 2007 Mount Sinai Press Office
> Tel: (212) 241-9200
> E-mail: NewsMedia(a)mssm.edu
>
> Study Shows Food Preparation May Play a Bigger Role in Chronic Disease
> than was Previously Thought
>
>
> How your food is cooked may be as important to your health as the food
> itself. Researchers now know more about a new class of toxins that
> might soon become as important a risk factor for heart disease and
> metabolic disorders as trans fats.
>
> This class of toxins, called advanced glycation end products (AGEs),
> are absorbed into the body through the consumption of grilled, fried,
> or broiled animal products, such as meats and cheeses. AGEs, which are
> also produced when food products are sterilized and pasteurized, have
> been linked to inflammation, insulin resistance, diabetes, vascular
> and kidney disease, and Alzheimer's disease.

Dietary AGEs and uremic toxins can be largely prevented from being
absorbed into the body from the intestinal tract, by oral
administration of Kremezin with meals. This porous beaded activated
carbon product (not absorbed by the body) adsorbs these compounds
enabling them to be eliminated in feces. I and Kitty are currently
taking 6 and 4 grams respectively with our one daily meal. See my
review page at: http://morelife.org/supplements/kremezin.html

--Paul Wakfer

MoreLife for the rational - http://morelife.org
Reality based tools for more life in quantity and quality
The Self-Sovereign Individual Project - http://selfsip.org
Rational freedom by self-sovereignty & social contracting

From: Jefferson on
Paul Antonik Wakfer wrote:
> Tim Campbell wrote:
>
>>Press Releases
>>For Embargoed Release
>>April 24, 2007 Mount Sinai Press Office
>>Tel: (212) 241-9200
>>E-mail: NewsMedia(a)mssm.edu
>>
>>Study Shows Food Preparation May Play a Bigger Role in Chronic Disease
>>than was Previously Thought
>>
>>
>>How your food is cooked may be as important to your health as the food
>>itself. Researchers now know more about a new class of toxins that
>>might soon become as important a risk factor for heart disease and
>>metabolic disorders as trans fats.
>>
>>This class of toxins, called advanced glycation end products (AGEs),
>>are absorbed into the body through the consumption of grilled, fried,
>>or broiled animal products, such as meats and cheeses. AGEs, which are
>>also produced when food products are sterilized and pasteurized, have
>>been linked to inflammation, insulin resistance, diabetes, vascular
>>and kidney disease, and Alzheimer's disease.
>
>
> Dietary AGEs and uremic toxins can be largely prevented from being
> absorbed into the body from the intestinal tract, by oral
> administration of Kremezin with meals. This porous beaded activated
> carbon product (not absorbed by the body) adsorbs these compounds
> enabling them to be eliminated in feces. I and Kitty are currently
> taking 6 and 4 grams respectively with our one daily meal. See my
> review page at: http://morelife.org/supplements/kremezin.html
>
> --Paul Wakfer
>
> MoreLife for the rational - http://morelife.org
> Reality based tools for more life in quantity and quality
> The Self-Sovereign Individual Project - http://selfsip.org
> Rational freedom by self-sovereignty & social contracting
>

Benfotiamine also has been proven to be protective against AGE formation.

Benfotiamine Prevents Macro- and Microvascular Endothelial Dysfunction
and Oxidative Stress Following a Meal Rich in Advanced Glycation End
Products in Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes -
http://care.diabetesjournals.org/cgi/content/full/29/9/2064

The benfotiamine dose used was 1,050 mg/day.

Alin Stirban, MD1, Monica Negrean, MD1, Bernd Stratmann, PHD1, Thomas
Gawlowski, MS1, Tina Horstmann1, Christian Gļæ½tting, PHD1, Knut Kleesiek,
MD1, Michaela Mueller-Roesel, MD1, Theodor Koschinsky, MD2, Jaime
Uribarri, MD3, Helen Vlassara, MD3 and Diethelm Tschoepe, MD

The timing of the articles may be significant since Helen Vlassara was a
co-author of the article in which the press release was based as well as
the one I have cited from Diabetes Journal. Dr. Vlassara has
co-authored previous articles on the same topic, so what was new (novel)?

Frank
From: Thomas Carter on
On Apr 30, 4:53 pm, Paul Antonik Wakfer <p...(a)morelife.org> wrote:
> Tim Campbell wrote:
> > Press Releases
> > For Embargoed Release
> > April 24, 2007 Mount Sinai Press Office
> > Tel: (212) 241-9200
> > E-mail: NewsMe...(a)mssm.edu
>
> > Study Shows Food Preparation May Play a Bigger Role in Chronic Disease
> > than was Previously Thought
>
> > How your food is cooked may be as important to your health as the food
> > itself. Researchers now know more about a new class of toxins that
> > might soon become as important a risk factor for heart disease and
> > metabolic disorders as trans fats.
>
> > This class of toxins, called advanced glycation end products (AGEs),
> > are absorbed into the body through the consumption of grilled, fried,
> > or broiled animal products, such as meats and cheeses. AGEs, which are
> > also produced when food products are sterilized and pasteurized, have
> > been linked to inflammation, insulin resistance, diabetes, vascular
> > and kidney disease, and Alzheimer's disease.
>
> Dietary AGEs and uremic toxins can be largely prevented from being
> absorbed into the body from the intestinal tract, by oral
> administration of Kremezin with meals. This porous beaded activated
> carbon product (not absorbed by the body) adsorbs these compounds
> enabling them to be eliminated in feces. I and Kitty are currently
> taking 6 and 4 grams respectively with our one daily meal. See my
> review page at:http://morelife.org/supplements/kremezin.html
>
> --Paul Wakfer
>
> MoreLife for the rational -http://morelife.org
> Reality based tools for more life in quantity and quality
> The Self-Sovereign Individual Project -http://selfsip.org
> Rational freedom by self-sovereignty & social contracting- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Hi Paul,

Another great find. A few years ago we discussed charcoal use by
the Russians. Some speculated that the results posted were due to
calorie restriction caused by absorption into the charcoal. Now it
seems more likely to be kidney preservation since rodents die of
kidney failure to a great extent. The NF-kappaB conection is very
interesting and could account for the vascular benefits you show in
your data base. Here're a couple of the interesting abstracts from
the old discussion. The cholesterol link is interesting and anyone
without already low levels might want to check theirs after starting
on this regimen.

Thomas

CARBON-BASED PHARMACEUTICALS AS A NOVEL PROLONGEVITY STRATEGY
E.N. Gorban, V.K. Koltover
Bio-ReliInstitute of Gerontology, National Academy of Medical
Sciences, Kiev, Ukraine, and Reliability Group, Institute of Problems
of Chemical Physics, RAS, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region, 142,432
Russia
The aim of this study was to demonstrate the prospects of
applications of the novel carbon-based pharmaceuticals, namely -
enterosorbents and fullerenes in biomedical gerontology. We present
the results of our own studies as well as the analytical review of the
literature data that were available up to now. The dietary
enterosorbent, SKN non-coated nitrogen-containing carbon, was found to
increase the mean value of male Wistar rats' life-span by 43%, that is
comparable with the life-span prolongation effects of the calorie-
restricted diets (Frolkis et al., 1989). Some antioxidants, like
butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), when regularly administered into the
diets, were also found to increase the life-spans of the animals up to
30% (Harman, 1968; Frolkis et al., 1990). The discovery of new carbon
allotropes, the fullerenes (Kroto et al., 1985), has furthered the
searching of novel carbon-based drugs. Various water-soluble multi-
hydroxyl fullerenes (fullerenols), such as C60(OH)n, demonstrating
antioxidant properties have been synthesized recently. Furthermore,
endohedral metallofullerenes (M(a)C2n) were synthesized, which are
carbon clusters that contain metal atoms (M = La, Sc, Y, etc.) trapped
within a fullerene cage. M(a)C2n hold much promise as the contrast
agents for NMR imaging. For example, relaxivity of Gd-fullerenol has
turned out to be 20-folds higher than that of Gd-DTPA (Mikawa et al.,
2001). While Gd-DTPA accelerates the NMR relaxation of water protons
owing to its large dipolar magnetic moment and long electron spin-
relaxation time, the 'spin leakage' of the fullerene shell supplies
more effective relaxation mechanism through the contact coupling of
the electron spin of M(a)C82 with the solvent nuclear spins (Koltover et
al., 2002). Furthermore, M(a)C2n with the appropriate particle-emitting
radionuclides inside, among them, beta-emitting 89Sr, 90Y, 47Sc, 64Cu,
149Pr, 153Sm, 166Ho, and 177Lu can be synthesized, while advances in
the molecular biotechnology provide targeting vectors to deliver
therapeutic doses of the ionizing radiation with high specificity for
treatment of metastasis cancer tumor cells. Thus, M(a)C2n, due to their
unique physical and chemical properties, provide obvious prospects for
designing novel paramagnetic probes and therapeutic
radiopharmaceuticals with solitary biomedical features.
Key words: aging, life-span prolongation, fullerenes, eneterosorbents
..................


Klin Med (Mosk). 1991 Jun;69(6):51-3. Related Articles, Links
[Use of enterosorption for correction of dyslipoproteinemias in
patients with ischemic heart disease in geriatric practice]
[Article in Russian]
Korkushko OV, Bogatskaia LN, Novikova SN, Kotko DN, Nikolaev VG,
Shcherbitskaia EV.
Sixty patients with coronary heart disease, stable angina
pectoris of functional class II and III and dislipoproteinemia
(cholesterol greater than 6.5 mmol/l, triglycerides greater than 2.0
mmol/l, the atherogenic index greater than 3.5) were assigned to two
groups. 40 patients received enterosorbent (high-porous, small-
spherical fraction of CKH carbon). 20 control subjects were treated
with placebo. The patients age ranged from 60 to 74. The treatment
course lasted for 4 weeks. Evaluation of the treatment results showed
that total cholesterol dropped by 20%, triglycerides by 27%, apoB by
32%, apoB-containing lipoproteins by 20%; there were positive changes
in circulation, clinical status (in 60% of cases), exercise tolerance
(by 12%). Control patients did not present any noticeable shifts.
Thus, enterosorption proved an effective modality of
dyslipoproteinemia correction in coronary patients of advanced
age.PMID: 1774911...............

From: Paul Antonik Wakfer on

Jefferson wrote:
> Paul Antonik Wakfer wrote:
> > Tim Campbell wrote:
> >
> >>Press Releases
> >>For Embargoed Release
> >>April 24, 2007 Mount Sinai Press Office
> >>Tel: (212) 241-9200
> >>E-mail: NewsMedia(a)mssm.edu
> >>
> >>Study Shows Food Preparation May Play a Bigger Role in Chronic Disease
> >>than was Previously Thought
> >>
> >>
> >>How your food is cooked may be as important to your health as the food
> >>itself. Researchers now know more about a new class of toxins that
> >>might soon become as important a risk factor for heart disease and
> >>metabolic disorders as trans fats.
> >>
> >>This class of toxins, called advanced glycation end products (AGEs),
> >>are absorbed into the body through the consumption of grilled, fried,
> >>or broiled animal products, such as meats and cheeses. AGEs, which are
> >>also produced when food products are sterilized and pasteurized, have
> >>been linked to inflammation, insulin resistance, diabetes, vascular
> >>and kidney disease, and Alzheimer's disease.
> >
> >
> > Dietary AGEs and uremic toxins can be largely prevented from being
> > absorbed into the body from the intestinal tract, by oral
> > administration of Kremezin with meals. This porous beaded activated
> > carbon product (not absorbed by the body) adsorbs these compounds
> > enabling them to be eliminated in feces. I and Kitty are currently
> > taking 6 and 4 grams respectively with our one daily meal. See my
> > review page at: http://morelife.org/supplements/kremezin.html
> >
> > --Paul Wakfer
> >
> > MoreLife for the rational - http://morelife.org
> > Reality based tools for more life in quantity and quality
> > The Self-Sovereign Individual Project - http://selfsip.org
> > Rational freedom by self-sovereignty & social contracting
> >
>
> Benfotiamine also has been proven to be protective against AGE formation.
>
> Benfotiamine Prevents Macro- and Microvascular Endothelial Dysfunction
> and Oxidative Stress Following a Meal Rich in Advanced Glycation End
> Products in Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes -
> http://care.diabetesjournals.org/cgi/content/full/29/9/2064

There are many, many chemicals and supplements that will inhibit AGE
formation within the body - pyridoxamine, thiamine pyrophosphate,
carnosine, histidine, aminoguanidine, tenilsetam, metformin and
aspirin to name but a few of them. However, none of these will prevent
the absorption and ill-effects from dietary AGEs in the food one eats,
once they get into the body (which is what the posted article was
mainly about). In addition, alagebrium chloride will break some kinds
of AGEs after they are formed and so might help a little with dietary
AGEs. However, AFAIK Kremezin is the only compound that will prevent
dietary AGEs from even entering the body, thus greatly reducing the
AGE load on the system. The only other way would be to eat an entirely
raw diet, but that has other potential problems and is unappetizing
for many people.

--Paul Wakfer

MoreLife for the rational - http://morelife.org
Reality based tools for more life in quantity and quality
The Self-Sovereign Individual Project - http://selfsip.org
Rational freedom by self-sovereignty & social contracting