From: Mark Thorson on
Paul Antonik Wakfer wrote:
>
> Dietary AGEs and uremic toxins can be largely prevented from being
> absorbed into the body from the intestinal tract, by oral
> administration of Kremezin with meals. This porous beaded activated
> carbon product (not absorbed by the body) adsorbs these compounds
> enabling them to be eliminated in feces. I and Kitty are currently
> taking 6 and 4 grams respectively with our one daily meal. See my
> review page at: http://morelife.org/supplements/kremezin.html

Won't that also remove an unknown amount
of micronutrients? And if you replace
those micronutrients with supplements,
how would you know how much to take,
unless you regularly test your blood
with a sensitive instrument (like an
atomic absorption spectrometer)?

Some micronutrients can be toxic even
in small amounts, such as copper, vanadium,
and molybdenum. I don't see how you could
control these at safe levels, unless you
were measuring your plasma concentration.
From: Paul Antonik Wakfer on

Mark Thorson wrote:
> Paul Antonik Wakfer wrote:
> >
> > Dietary AGEs and uremic toxins can be largely prevented from being
> > absorbed into the body from the intestinal tract, by oral
> > administration of Kremezin with meals. This porous beaded activated
> > carbon product (not absorbed by the body) adsorbs these compounds
> > enabling them to be eliminated in feces. I and Kitty are currently
> > taking 6 and 4 grams respectively with our one daily meal. See my
> > review page at: http://morelife.org/supplements/kremezin.html
>
> Won't that also remove an unknown amount
> of micronutrients?

This was also an initial concern of mine. However, it appears that
unlike more generalized fibers and also plain actived charcoal,
Kremezin's porous carbon spheres are specifically targeted at AGE
compounds (particularly carboxymethyllysine) and at indole, which is
derived from tryptophan in the digestive tract and, after absorption,
hepatically converted to the uremic toxin indoxyl sulfate. None of the
many studies with both animals and humans have shown any evidence of
significant removal of micronutrients by Kremezin.

In addition, in the Russian experiment cites by Thomas Carter with a
somewhat different type of carbon enteroadsorbent, there could not
have been significant elimination of micronutrients or else the
lifespan increase would not have happened.

> And if you replace
> those micronutrients with supplements,
> how would you know how much to take,
> unless you regularly test your blood
> with a sensitive instrument (like an
> atomic absorption spectrometer)?
>
> Some micronutrients can be toxic even
> in small amounts, such as copper, vanadium,
> and molybdenum. I don't see how you could
> control these at safe levels, unless you
> were measuring your plasma concentration.

Your reasoning here is valid and are why I have never used fibers very
much and have generally been negative on the idea of eating lots of
fat and then using chitosan to eliminate it. With dietary AGEs and
Kremezin, I think the situation is significantly different.

--Paul Wakfer

MoreLife for the rational - http://morelife.org
Reality based tools for more life in quantity and quality
The Self-Sovereign Individual Project - http://selfsip.org
Rational freedom by self-sovereignty & social contracting

From: Jefferson on
Paul Antonik Wakfer wrote:

> There are many, many chemicals and supplements that will inhibit AGE
> formation within the body - pyridoxamine, thiamine pyrophosphate,
> carnosine, histidine, aminoguanidine, tenilsetam, metformin and
> aspirin to name but a few of them. However, none of these will prevent
> the absorption and ill-effects from dietary AGEs in the food one eats,
> once they get into the body (which is what the posted article was
> mainly about). In addition, alagebrium chloride will break some kinds
> of AGEs after they are formed and so might help a little with dietary
> AGEs. However, AFAIK Kremezin is the only compound that will prevent
> dietary AGEs from even entering the body, thus greatly reducing the
> AGE load on the system. The only other way would be to eat an entirely
> raw diet, but that has other potential problems and is unappetizing
> for many people.
>

Kremezin as an alternative strategy to reduce the temporal increase of
serum uric acids
Accession number;05A0758110
Title;Kremezin as an alternative strategy to reduce the temporal
increase of serum uric acids
Author;OKAMOTO HIROSHI(Inst. Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical Coll.)
TANIGUCHI ATSUO(Inst. Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical Coll.)
YANAMAKA HISASHI(Inst. Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical Coll.)
KAMATANI NAOYUKI(Inst. Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical Coll.)
Journal Title;Gout and Nucleic Acid Metabolism
Journal Code:Y0796A
ISSN:1344-9796
VOL.29;NO.1;PAGE.9-14(2005)
Figure&Table&Reference;FIG.4, TBL.1, REF.4
Pub. Country;Japan
Language;Japanese
Abstract;In patients with hyperuricemia, gouty attacks are induced by
rapid changes in serum uric acid (UA) levels. One of the cause of the
rapid increase in serum UA level is a hyperpurine diet such as alcohol
intake. We present here an unique experimental data showing that
Kremezin, which is widely used to reduce the serum creatinine level by
absorbing creatinine in the intestine to prevent the development of
renal failure, is useful to reduce the serum uric acid (UA) level.
First, we studied the effect of Kremezin in an animal model. We used
rats with oral inosine load test after injection of the anti-uricase
compound oxonic acid (OA). Kremezin was given orally just before the
loading with inosine-containing food. Kremezin reduced the elevation of
serum uric acid. Kremezin could absorb not only inosine but also other
purine bases in vitro (e.g. inosine: 98.6%, purine: 99.3%, adenine:
96.5%, adenosine: 98.3%, guanosine: 99.1%, etc). Next, we studied the
effect of Kremezin on the increase in serum UA concentration in healthy
volunteers after drinking beer (1L in 10min.). One hour after taking
beer, blood samples were taken and UA concentrations were determined.
Kremezin reduced the increase in serum UA levels compared with that in
those who took beer without premedication (control). Based on these
findings, we suggest that Kremezin might be useful to stabilize the
serum UA levels by absorbing purine bases in alcoholic beverage as well
as in foods. Therefore Kremezin is an alternative strategy to reduce the
increased risk of gout following alcohol intake. (author abst.)

Frank