From: Jamie Clark on
"Ericka Kammerer" <eek(a)comcast.net> wrote in message
news:T--dnfWAqrvRPGzYnZ2dnUVZ_rSjnZ2d(a)comcast.com...
> sylviafrances via FamilyKB.com wrote:
>> Hi There,
>>
>> I just posted about an u/s measurement and now I just came back from my
>> midwife appointment.
>>
>> My midwife said that she is very pleased with my measurements...even
>> though I
>> measured 31 cm at 37 weeks! She said because my stomach circumference
>> has
>> grown there is nothing to worry about! She said its all fine and
>> normal...my
>> weight gain as well... Does this sound strange...?
>>
>> She also estimated the current weight to be about 3 kgs--my u/s yesterday
>> estimated 2.5. Also yesterday my doc measured my fundal height to be 35
>> and
>> one day later my midwife measures it 4 cm smaller....?
>>
>> I do trust my midwife. When it comes to pregnancy and birth she has a
>> very
>> wide range of what is "normal." But does anyone find this a bit
>> strange...?
>
> You speak as if you expect all these measurements
> to be perfect and precise. They're not. There's variation
> from measurer to measurer. Especially this late in the
> game there's variation from baby to baby. Fundal height
> can be quite sensitive to the position of the baby. Late
> term estimates of size can be off substantially, even with
> experienced providers and regardless of the technique used.
> Just relax. Your care providers aren't concerned, and there
> doesn't seem to be any evidence that they're being cavalier
> about anything they ought to be concerned about.
>
> Best wishes,
> Ericka

Yes, what Ericka said.

It's hard to be precise in measuring a body while immersed in fluid and
constantly moving. Each time they measure, the baby could be in a different
position -- some days quite scrunched up and curled, and other days kicking
and stretching out to his fullest. Or engaged in the pelvis more on one day
than the previous.

In general with health issues, but more specifically pregnancy issues, if
your caregivers aren't concerned, then there is no reason why you should be
concerned.

This sounds to me like a situation where you are used to normally being very
in charge and have an expert knowledge of what is going on, so you are
taking detailed notes and reading the files, but you don't have the expert
knowledge to go with it. This is then making you question everything.

I'd recommend at this point that you stop trying to be her doctor and just
support her as her husband. Massage her feet, draw her a warm bath, pour
her a short glass of wine at the end of a long day, but don't spend any more
time fretting over this measurement or that measurement. I would guess that
you stressing out about these things is probably adding stress to your wife
as well. You relaxing and trusting her doctors will help her to relax and
trust her doctors.

Just my 2 cents.
--

Jamie
Earth Angels:
Taylor Marlys -- 01/03/03
Addison Grace -- 09/30/04

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From: sylviafrances via FamilyKB.com on
Thanks for your responses...Jamie, I am the wife : ) I think you
misunderstood my post...But the glass of wine sounds good : )

Jamie Clark wrote:
>>> Hi There,
>>>
>[quoted text clipped - 32 lines]
>> Best wishes,
>> Ericka
>
>Yes, what Ericka said.
>
>It's hard to be precise in measuring a body while immersed in fluid and
>constantly moving. Each time they measure, the baby could be in a different
>position -- some days quite scrunched up and curled, and other days kicking
>and stretching out to his fullest. Or engaged in the pelvis more on one day
>than the previous.
>
>In general with health issues, but more specifically pregnancy issues, if
>your caregivers aren't concerned, then there is no reason why you should be
>concerned.
>
>This sounds to me like a situation where you are used to normally being very
>in charge and have an expert knowledge of what is going on, so you are
>taking detailed notes and reading the files, but you don't have the expert
>knowledge to go with it. This is then making you question everything.
>
>I'd recommend at this point that you stop trying to be her doctor and just
>support her as her husband. Massage her feet, draw her a warm bath, pour
>her a short glass of wine at the end of a long day, but don't spend any more
>time fretting over this measurement or that measurement. I would guess that
>you stressing out about these things is probably adding stress to your wife
>as well. You relaxing and trusting her doctors will help her to relax and
>trust her doctors.
>
>Just my 2 cents.

--
Message posted via http://www.familykb.com

From: alath on

> You speak as if you expect all these measurements
> to be perfect and precise. They're not. There's variation
> from measurer to measurer. Especially this late in the
> game there's variation

Personally, I don't even do FH measurements after 35-36 weeks, but
rather do a hands-on estimate of fetal weight instead.

What you say about intra-examiner reliability and fetal position is
true. Also, FH dropping off in late pregnancy is often due to
engagement of the fetal presenting part.

As for a hands-on examiner saying the fetus is 2500g and an ultrasound
saying 3000g, those are both within the same margin of error.
According to most studies of this kind of thing, your midwife is just
as likely to be right as your sonographer is. If the kid is really
2750, then both your midwife and your sonographer are doing a better
job estimating than most.