From: enough on


RichA wrote:
> On Oct 24, 3:41 pm, enough <blinkingblyth...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
> > http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml09/09335.html
>
> $40 DVD players are a waste of money. They don't even last a year,
I read about how some cheap portable CD players were being put
together with hot glue, and how they were ment not to last more than a
year.
From: Rod Speed on
enough wrote
> RichA wrote
>> enough <blinkingblyth...(a)gmail.com> wrote

>>> http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml09/09335.html

>> $40 DVD players are a waste of money. They don't even last a year,

> I read about how some cheap portable CD players were being put together with hot glue,

Makes sense with stuff no one ever repairs.

> and how they were ment not to last more than a year.

Mindlessly silly. There is nothing in a CD player where that approach is even possible.


From: Michael Black on
On Tue, 3 Nov 2009, enough wrote:

>
> RichA wrote:
>> On Oct 24, 3:41 pm, enough <blinkingblyth...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>>> http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml09/09335.html
>>
>> $40 DVD players are a waste of money. They don't even last a year,
> I read about how some cheap portable CD players were being put
> together with hot glue, and how they were ment not to last more than a
> year.
>
People get what they pay for. They seem to want cheap, so they shouldn't
be surprised when they get things that can't last long.

I paid $500 for my first printer, in 1982. Wasn't anywhere near letter
quality, was terribly slow, had no descenders, but hey it was pretty much
the only printer I could get for that little.

I paid $400 for my next one, in 1984, it was a daisywheel and gave me good
quality printing.

I then paid $300 for my second dot matrix printer in 1989, it was faster
than the first two, and did give near letter quality, so it let me do away
with the two previous printers.

Printers became a "necessity", people even thinking they had to have
color, so manufacturers started providing that "need". The lower the
price, the more they could sell, since people didn't want to pay hundreds
of dollars. So the prices dropped, and while mass manufacturing can drop
costs, one has to believe that they had to take steps to make it cheaper
to make.

Look at the first generation of anything. It's sturdy, lots of metal, and
big, and very very expensive. The price drops, more people buy, they cut
manufacturing costs, and it keeps cycling through until there's not much
metal in the unit, and it's dirt cheap.

If you pay hundreds of dollars for a printer, you expect it to last a long
time, and may be even willing to spend money on its repair.

When it's a few tens of dollars, you certainly won't pay much to have it
repaired (so then that even drops the manufacturer's incentive to make it
repairable, especially if making it throwaway makes it cheaper to make).
You also won't grumble when it fails, "oh, I only paid $30 for it". How
many inkjet printers get tossed because people decide it's better to buy a
new printer ("hey, I got a new printer, it's better than the last one")
than buy new ink cartridges for the old?

Those people have decided at what point something is cheap enough to throw
away, and they've decided that the best product is something cheap.

Michael

From: rincewind on
On Oct 24, 6:13 pm, RichA <rander3...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
> On Oct 24, 3:41 pm, enough <blinkingblyth...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>
> >http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml09/09335.html
>
> $40 DVD players are a waste of money.  They don't even last a year,
> their output is TRASH.

Mine's about three years old, still works fine, hasn't caught on fire.
Your logic is in doubt.