From: Jan Drew on
http://www.philly.com/philly/news/homepage/87437502.html

Autism-study doctor facing grant probe
Accusations over funds stir those who reject that there is no vaccine
link to the disorder.
By Josh Goldstein

Inquirer Staff Writer

A Danish scientist involved in two major studies that debunked any
linkage of vaccines to autism is suspected of misappropriating $2
million in U.S. grants at his university in Denmark.

Poul Thorsen, a medical doctor and Ph.D., was an adjunct professor at
the Drexel University School of Public Health for several months
before resigning Tuesday.

On Jan. 22, Aarhus University said that it had uncovered a
"considerable shortfall" in grant money from the U.S. Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention for a research program that Thorsen had
directed. The university referred the matter to police, who are
conducting an investigation.

"CDC is aware of the allegations by Aarhus University against Poul
Thorsen," agency spokesman Tom Skinner said in a statement. Federal
authorities are investigating.

Efforts to reach Thorsen for comment by phone and e-mail this week
were unsuccessful.

In a statement, Drexel University said that Thorsen was an adjunct at
its School of Public Health from Dec. 11 until "he resigned his
appointment with the school of public health on March 9, 2010."

"Questions about Thorsen's scientific integrity may finally force CDC
to rethink the vaccine protocols since most of the other key pro-
vaccine studies cited by CDC rely on the findings of Thorsen's
research group," Robert F. Kennedy Jr. wrote on the Huffington Post.
"The validity of all these studies is now in question."

In its statement, Aarhus University said the Danish Agency for
Science, Technology, and Innovation (DASTI) has gotten grants from the
U.S. National Center for Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities
since 2001. Thorsen directed the administration of the grants, the
university said.

After discovering that money was missing, DASTI and Aarhus "became
aware of two alleged CDC funding documents as well as a letter
regarding funding commitments allegedly written by Randolph B.
Williams of the CDC's procurement grants office. . . ."

"Upon investigation by CDC, a suspicion arose that those documents are
forgeries."

The university's statement goes on to say that in March 2009, Thorsen
resigned from its faculty.

In Atlanta, where Thorsen is thought to live, Emory University said he
began working there Sept. 1, 2003, as a part-time adjunct professor in
its School of Public Health. Emory said that from April 2008 to June
2009, Thorsen "served as a full-time research professor. He is no
longer employed at Emory."

"It is a sad story," wrote Melbye of the Statens Serum Institut in an
e-mail. "We are all here with one big question: What has happened and
why?"
From: Mark Probert on
On Mar 17, 3:13 am, COUSIN Jan Drew-PROBERT <jdrew63...(a)aol.com>
wrote:
> http://www.philly.com/philly/news/homepage/87437502.html
>
> Autism-study doctor facing grant probe
> Accusations over funds stir those who reject that there is no vaccine
> link to the disorder.
> By Josh Goldstein
>
> Inquirer Staff Writer
>
> A Danish scientist involved in two major studies that debunked any
> linkage of vaccines to autism is suspected of misappropriating $2
> million in U.S. grants at his university in Denmark.
>
> Poul Thorsen, a medical doctor and Ph.D., was an adjunct professor at
> the Drexel University School of Public Health for several months
> before resigning Tuesday.
>
> On Jan. 22, Aarhus University said that it had uncovered a
> "considerable shortfall" in grant money from the U.S. Centers for
> Disease Control and Prevention for a research program that Thorsen had
> directed. The university referred the matter to police, who are
> conducting an investigation.
>
> "CDC is aware of the allegations by Aarhus University against Poul
> Thorsen," agency spokesman Tom Skinner said in a statement. Federal
> authorities are investigating.
>
> Efforts to reach Thorsen for comment by phone and e-mail this week
> were unsuccessful.
>
> In a statement, Drexel University said that Thorsen was an adjunct at
> its School of Public Health from Dec. 11 until "he resigned his
> appointment with the school of public health on March 9, 2010."
>
> "Questions about Thorsen's scientific integrity may finally force CDC
> to rethink the vaccine protocols since most of the other key pro-
> vaccine studies cited by CDC rely on the findings of Thorsen's
> research group," Robert F. Kennedy Jr. wrote on the Huffington Post.
> "The validity of all these studies is now in question."
>
> In its statement, Aarhus University said the Danish Agency for
> Science, Technology, and Innovation (DASTI) has gotten grants from the
> U.S. National Center for Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities
> since 2001. Thorsen directed the administration of the grants, the
> university said.
>
> After discovering that money was missing, DASTI and Aarhus "became
> aware of two alleged CDC funding documents as well as a letter
> regarding funding commitments allegedly written by Randolph B.
> Williams of the CDC's procurement grants office. . . ."
>
> "Upon investigation by CDC, a suspicion arose that those documents are
> forgeries."
>
> The university's statement goes on to say that in March 2009, Thorsen
> resigned from its faculty.
>
> In Atlanta, where Thorsen is thought to live, Emory University said he
> began working there Sept. 1, 2003, as a part-time adjunct professor in
> its School of Public Health. Emory said that from April 2008 to June
> 2009, Thorsen "served as a full-time research professor. He is no
> longer employed at Emory."
>
> "It is a sad story," wrote Melbye of the Statens Serum Institut in an
> e-mail. "We are all here with one big question: What has happened and
> why?"

Cousin Jan, Handley is a lying sack of steaming cleanse by-products.
AoA is the cesspool of the anti-vaxxers. They are not to be believed.
Read this:

In both of the “Danish papers” in question (why am I reminded of
Hamlet?), Dr. Thorsen was a “sandwich” author. Why is this important?


The pattern followed in biology and medicine is that the first
(“lead”) author is the person who did the bulk of the work, the last
(“anchor”) author is the person who “owns” the lab or is the senior
author and the rest (the “sandwich” authors) either did some work
(e.g. lab techs, assistants, undergraduates, graduate students
working
on a secondary project, etc.) provided some special service or
expertise (e.g. statistical analysis, specialised analytical testing,
special techniques, etc.) or needed to be acknowledged by more than
mentioning their name under “acknowledgements”.


Some labs have are very “stingy” about who they add as authors,
others
will list as authors anyone who touched the project in any way.
Generally, if any or all of the “sandwich” authors contributed as
much
as the lead author (or anchor author), there will be mention of that
somewhere in the paper, usually right below the author list.


It also needs to be emphasised that Dr. Thorsen’s “offense” may (and
probably is) no more than not giving Aarhus University their “cut” of
his grant money. Universities traditionally get a portion of all
grant
money that comes to researchers from outside the university, either
as
a separate payment from the granting agency or as a “tithe” (usually
more like 50%) from the grant. This is called “overhead”.


I suspect that the $2 million is money that Aarhus University thinks
they should have gotten as “overhead” while Dr. Thorsen was working
elsewhere. The other likely possibility is that Aarhus University
feels grants Dr. Thorsen received while on their faculty should have
been spent in their facilities, rather than paying for salaries and
supplies somewhere else.


At any rate, the least likely possibility is that Dr. Thorsen
actually
embezzled any money, since he had no direct access to the money.
Grants don’t arrive as boxes of cash – they are paid to the
university
or research center which then has their financial department disburse
the funds as purchase orders (which are scrutinised by the financial
department to ensure that they conform to the terms of the grant) or
as salaries (which are scrutinised by both the financial and
personnel
departments).


This is a tempest in a teapot raised by those people who had “hitched
their wagons” to Andy Wakefield’s star and are distressed by how far
and fast that star has fallen. They hope to regain some “sparkle” by
tarnishing the research that has refuted their claims.


Unfortunately, even if all the research touched by Dr. Thorsen were
to
magically disappear, there would still be more than enough to refute
the claim that vaccines – with or without thimerosal – cause autism.


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