From: Mark Probert on
On May 7, 6:32 pm, Peter Bowditch <myfirstn...(a)ratbags.com> wrote:
> dr_jeff <u...(a)msu.edu> wrote:
> >Happy Oyster wrote:
> >> On Thu, 6 May 2010 06:13:28 +0100, "john" <nos...(a)bt.com> wrote:
>
> >>> The brighter the stupid burns, the more chance
> >>> that someone will see the light.
>
> >> The anti-vaccination morons never are bright. The even do not shine bright, when
> >> roasting their behind, like John Scudamore... ;O)
>
> >That's not true. People can be true believers and blind to evidence and
> >facts. These people can be bright.
>
> As an example, Professor Boyd Haley could not have climbed to head of
> the school of chemistry at the University of Kentucky if he was a
> dullard. Other examples are the creationists Michael Behe and William
> Dembski. All of these people are hopelessly wrong but all of them are
> bright.

A better example is Adlof Hitler, whose I Q was estimated to be 141.

From: Jan Drew on

Jan Drew wrote:
>
>
> >http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20049214

Environ Health Perspect. 2009 Dec;117(12):1932-8. Epub 2009 Aug 19.

Mercury induces an unopposed inflammatory response in human peripheral
blood mononuclear cells in vitro.
Gardner RM, Nyland JF, Evans SL, Wang SB, Doyle KM, Crainiceanu CM,
Silbergeld EK.

Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg
School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA.

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The human immune response to mercury is not well
characterized despite the body of evidence that suggests that Hg can
modulate immune responses, including the induction of autoimmune
disease in some mouse models. Dysregulation of cytokine signaling
appears to play an important role in the etiology of Hg-induced
autoimmunity in animal models. OBJECTIVES: In this study, we
systematically investigated the human immune response to Hg in vitro
in terms of cytokine release. METHODS: Human peripheral blood
mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from 20 volunteers who donated
blood six separate times. PBMCs were cultured with lipopolysaccharide
and concentrations of mercuric chloride (HgCl(2)) up to 200 nM. Seven
cytokines representing important pathways in physiologic and
pathologic immune responses were measured in supernatants. We used
multilevel models to account for the intrinsic clustering in the
cytokine data due to experimental design. RESULTS: We found a
consistent increase in the release of the proinflammatory cytokines
interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and
concurrent decrease in release of the antiinflammatory cytokines
interleukin 1-receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) and IL-10 in human PBMCs
treated with subcytotoxic concentrations of HgCl(2). IL-4, IL-17, and
interferon-gamma increased in a concentration-response manner. These
results were replicated in a second, independently recruited
population of 20 different volunteers. CONCLUSIONS: Low concentrations
of HgCl(2) affect immune function in human cells by dysregulation of
cytokine signaling pathways, with the potential to influence diverse
health outcomes such as susceptibility to infectious disease or risk
of autoimmunity.

PMID: 20049214 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

From: dr_jeff on
Peter Bowditch wrote:
> Donna <kevysmom10(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> So, are you saying some can ingest poison chemicals and not have a
>> reaction, while others can die from it? You dont make any sense.
>
> The chemical most commonly used for suicide attempts in Australia is
> acetaminophen. If this chemical was invented today it would probably
> not be allowed to be sold without a prescription from a doctor because
> of its toxicity to the liver, but right now a lethal dose can be
> purchased in supermarkets for a few dollars.

The lethal dose of alcohol and gasoline can be purchased for less in
many places.

What is more disturbing is that there are few efforts to make sure that
there is a safe limit imposed on drugs with acetominophen in them, so
that people don't take a toxic dose.

> The reaction that most people have to the millions of doses consumed
> around the world each day is that their headaches and other pains go
> away.
>
> The dose makes the poison.

True.

Jeff
From: Jan Drew on
Putz worte:

<garbage deleted
From: dr_jeff on
Jan Drew wrote:
> Jan Drew wrote:
> >
>>> http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20049214
>
> Environ Health Perspect. 2009 Dec;117(12):1932-8. Epub 2009 Aug 19.
>
> Mercury induces an unopposed inflammatory response in human peripheral
> blood mononuclear cells in vitro.
> Gardner RM, Nyland JF, Evans SL, Wang SB, Doyle KM, Crainiceanu CM,
> Silbergeld EK.
>
> Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg
> School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA.
>
> Abstract
> BACKGROUND: The human immune response to mercury is not well
> characterized despite the body of evidence that suggests that Hg can
> modulate immune responses, including the induction of autoimmune
> disease in some mouse models. Dysregulation of cytokine signaling
> appears to play an important role in the etiology of Hg-induced
> autoimmunity in animal models. OBJECTIVES: In this study, we
> systematically investigated the human immune response to Hg in vitro
> in terms of cytokine release. METHODS: Human peripheral blood
> mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from 20 volunteers who donated
> blood six separate times. PBMCs were cultured with lipopolysaccharide
> and concentrations of mercuric chloride (HgCl(2)) up to 200 nM. Seven
> cytokines representing important pathways in physiologic and
> pathologic immune responses were measured in supernatants. We used
> multilevel models to account for the intrinsic clustering in the
> cytokine data due to experimental design. RESULTS: We found a
> consistent increase in the release of the proinflammatory cytokines
> interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and
> concurrent decrease in release of the antiinflammatory cytokines
> interleukin 1-receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) and IL-10 in human PBMCs
> treated with subcytotoxic concentrations of HgCl(2). IL-4, IL-17, and
> interferon-gamma increased in a concentration-response manner. These
> results were replicated in a second, independently recruited
> population of 20 different volunteers. CONCLUSIONS: Low concentrations
> of HgCl(2) affect immune function in human cells by dysregulation of
> cytokine signaling pathways, with the potential to influence diverse
> health outcomes such as susceptibility to infectious disease or risk
> of autoimmunity.
>
> PMID: 20049214 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

The problems with this study as far as brain toxicity is that in the
blood is not the same as in the brain, the chemicals are not found in
vaccines (mercuric chloride is not in vaccines), and the doses is wrong,
as well.

Jeff
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