From: pautrey on
http://www.clinicaladvisor.com/do-children-with-otitis-media-need-antibiotics/article/170465/


Do children with otitis media need antibiotics?
May 18 2010



I have been told that pediatricians now state that most cases of
otitis media in children are viral in origin and do not require
antibiotic treatment. If this is true, what treatment do you
recommend? Watch and wait? Does the same approach apply to adults?—
JOSEPH CAMIRE, DO, West Plains, Mo.

You have been told correctly. In 2004, the American Academy of
Pediatrics and the American Academy of Family Physicians published
joint clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of
acute otitis media (Pediatrics. 2004;113:1451-1465). The recommended
treatment for children older than age two years is pain management and
observation (unless the patient is severely ill). Such oral analgesics
as acetaminophen or ibuprofen are most effective. A topical anesthetic
like benzocaine is another option and can be used alone or in
conjunction with oral analgesics.—Julee B. Waldrop, MS, PNP (139-4)

From the May 2010 Issue of Clinical Advisor


http://www.clinicaladvisor.com/do-children-with-otitis-media-need-antibiotics/article/170465/
From: pautrey on
On Jun 6, 11:12 am, pautrey <rpautr...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
> http://www.clinicaladvisor.com/do-children-with-otitis-media-need-ant...
>
> Do children with otitis media need antibiotics?
> May 18 2010
>
> I have been told that pediatricians now state that most cases of
> otitis media in children are viral in origin and do not require
> antibiotic treatment. If this is true, what treatment do you
> recommend? Watch and wait? Does the same approach apply to adults?—
> JOSEPH CAMIRE, DO, West Plains, Mo.
>
> You have been told correctly. In 2004, the American Academy of
> Pediatrics and the American Academy of Family Physicians published
> joint clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of
> acute otitis media (Pediatrics. 2004;113:1451-1465). The recommended
> treatment for children older than age two years is pain management and
> observation (unless the patient is severely ill). Such oral analgesics
> as acetaminophen or ibuprofen are most effective. A topical anesthetic
> like benzocaine is another option and can be used alone or in
> conjunction with oral analgesics.—Julee B. Waldrop, MS, PNP (139-4)
>
> From the May 2010 Issue of Clinical Advisor
>
> http://www.clinicaladvisor.com/do-children-with-otitis-media-need-ant...

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Antibiotics Turn My Daughter Into a Crazy, Whining Mess
Posted by Julie Ryan Evans on May 25, 2010 at 7:30 AM

http://thestir.cafemom.com/toddler/103566/Antibiotics_Turn_My_Daughter_Into
From: pautrey on
On Jun 6, 11:16 am, pautrey <rpautr...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
> On Jun 6, 11:12 am, pautrey <rpautr...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> >http://www.clinicaladvisor.com/do-children-with-otitis-media-need-ant...
>
> > Do children with otitis media need antibiotics?
> > May 18 2010
>
> > I have been told that pediatricians now state that most cases of
> > otitis media in children are viral in origin and do not require
> > antibiotic treatment. If this is true, what treatment do you
> > recommend? Watch and wait? Does the same approach apply to adults?—
> > JOSEPH CAMIRE, DO, West Plains, Mo.
>
> > You have been told correctly. In 2004, the American Academy of
> > Pediatrics and the American Academy of Family Physicians published
> > joint clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of
> > acute otitis media (Pediatrics. 2004;113:1451-1465). The recommended
> > treatment for children older than age two years is pain management and
> > observation (unless the patient is severely ill). Such oral analgesics
> > as acetaminophen or ibuprofen are most effective. A topical anesthetic
> > like benzocaine is another option and can be used alone or in
> > conjunction with oral analgesics.—Julee B. Waldrop, MS, PNP (139-4)
>
> > From the May 2010 Issue of Clinical Advisor
>
> >http://www.clinicaladvisor.com/do-children-with-otitis-media-need-ant...
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------­--------------------------------------
>
> Antibiotics Turn My Daughter Into a Crazy, Whining Mess
> Posted by Julie Ryan Evans on May 25, 2010 at 7:30 AM
>
> http://thestir.cafemom.com/toddler/103566/Antibiotics_Turn_My_Daughte...- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Antibiotics Can Cause Pervasive, Persistent Changes To Microbiota In
Human Gut

ScienceDaily (Nov. 19, 2008) — Using a novel technique developed by
Mitchell Sogin of the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) to identify
different types of bacteria, scientists have completed the most
precise survey to date of how microbial communities in the human gut
respond to antibiotic treatment.


Read More:
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081118121941.htm
From: pautrey on
On Jun 6, 11:20 am, pautrey <rpautr...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
> On Jun 6, 11:16 am, pautrey <rpautr...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Jun 6, 11:12 am, pautrey <rpautr...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > >http://www.clinicaladvisor.com/do-children-with-otitis-media-need-ant....
>
> > > Do children with otitis media need antibiotics?
> > > May 18 2010
>
> > > I have been told that pediatricians now state that most cases of
> > > otitis media in children are viral in origin and do not require
> > > antibiotic treatment. If this is true, what treatment do you
> > > recommend? Watch and wait? Does the same approach apply to adults?—
> > > JOSEPH CAMIRE, DO, West Plains, Mo.
>
> > > You have been told correctly. In 2004, the American Academy of
> > > Pediatrics and the American Academy of Family Physicians published
> > > joint clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of
> > > acute otitis media (Pediatrics. 2004;113:1451-1465). The recommended
> > > treatment for children older than age two years is pain management and
> > > observation (unless the patient is severely ill). Such oral analgesics
> > > as acetaminophen or ibuprofen are most effective. A topical anesthetic
> > > like benzocaine is another option and can be used alone or in
> > > conjunction with oral analgesics.—Julee B. Waldrop, MS, PNP (139-4)
>
> > > From the May 2010 Issue of Clinical Advisor
>
> > >http://www.clinicaladvisor.com/do-children-with-otitis-media-need-ant....
>
> > ---------------------------------------------------------------------------­­--------------------------------------
>
> > Antibiotics Turn My Daughter Into a Crazy, Whining Mess
> > Posted by Julie Ryan Evans on May 25, 2010 at 7:30 AM
>
> >http://thestir.cafemom.com/toddler/103566/Antibiotics_Turn_My_Daughte...Hide quoted text -
>
> > - Show quoted text -
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------­----------------------------------------
>
> Antibiotics Can Cause Pervasive, Persistent Changes To Microbiota In
> Human Gut
>
> ScienceDaily (Nov. 19, 2008) — Using a novel technique developed by
> Mitchell Sogin of the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) to identify
> different types of bacteria, scientists have completed the most
> precise survey to date of how microbial communities in the human gut
> respond to antibiotic treatment.
>
> Read More:http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081118121941.htm- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Probiotics may reduce day-care illnesses
Published: May 25, 2010 at 8:51 PM


WASHINGTON, May 25 (UPI) -- U.S. researchers suggest probiotics -- in
yogurt or supplements -- may help stem ear infections, flu and other
illnesses common among children in day care.

Researchers at the Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington,
led by Dr. Daniel Merenstein, found a 19 percent decrease of common
infections in children who daily ingested probiotics.

Specifically, the children had 24 percent fewer gastrointestinal
infections -- such as diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting -- and 18 percent
fewer upper respiratory tract infections -- such as ear infections,
sinusitis and strep.

Read More:
http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2010/05/25/Probiotics-may-reduce-day-care-illnesses/UPI-24421274835101/
From: pautrey on
On Jun 6, 1:42 pm, Bob Officer <boboffic...(a)127.0.0.7> wrote:
> On Sun, 6 Jun 2010 09:57:00 -0700 (PDT), in misc.health.alternative,
>
>
>
>
>
> pautrey <rpautr...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
> >On Jun 6, 11:20 am, pautrey <rpautr...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
> >> On Jun 6, 11:16 am, pautrey <rpautr...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>
> >> > On Jun 6, 11:12 am, pautrey <rpautr...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>
> >> > >http://www.clinicaladvisor.com/do-children-with-otitis-media-need-ant...
>
> >> > > Do children with otitis media need antibiotics?
> >> > > May 18 2010
>
> >> > > I have been told that pediatricians now state that most cases of
> >> > > otitis media in children are viral in origin and do not require
> >> > > antibiotic treatment. If this is true, what treatment do you
> >> > > recommend? Watch and wait? Does the same approach apply to adults?
> >> > > JOSEPH CAMIRE, DO, West Plains, Mo.
>
> >> > > You have been told correctly. In 2004, the American Academy of
> >> > > Pediatrics and the American Academy of Family Physicians published
> >> > > joint clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of
> >> > > acute otitis media (Pediatrics. 2004;113:1451-1465). The recommended
> >> > > treatment for children older than age two years is pain management and
> >> > > observation (unless the patient is severely ill). Such oral analgesics
> >> > > as acetaminophen or ibuprofen are most effective. A topical anesthetic
> >> > > like benzocaine is another option and can be used alone or in
> >> > > conjunction with oral analgesics. Julee B. Waldrop, MS, PNP (139-4)
>
> >> > > From the May 2010 Issue of Clinical Advisor
>
> >> > >http://www.clinicaladvisor.com/do-children-with-otitis-media-need-ant...
>
> >> > ---------------------------------------------------------------------------­ --------------------------------------
>
> >> > Antibiotics Turn My Daughter Into a Crazy, Whining Mess
> >> > Posted by Julie Ryan Evans on May 25, 2010 at 7:30 AM
>
> >> >http://thestir.cafemom.com/toddler/103566/Antibiotics_Turn_My_Daughte....quoted text -
>
> >> > - Show quoted text -
>
> >> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------­ ----------------------------------------
>
> >> Antibiotics Can Cause Pervasive, Persistent Changes To Microbiota In
> >> Human Gut
>
> >> ScienceDaily (Nov. 19, 2008) Using a novel technique developed by
> >> Mitchell Sogin of the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) to identify
> >> different types of bacteria, scientists have completed the most
> >> precise survey to date of how microbial communities in the human gut
> >> respond to antibiotic treatment.
>
> >> Read More:http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081118121941.htm-Hide quoted text -
>
> >> - Show quoted text -
>
> >--------------------------------------------------------------------------­--------------------------------------
>
> >Probiotics may reduce day-care illnesses
> >Published: May 25, 2010 at 8:51 PM
>
> >WASHINGTON, May 25 (UPI) -- U.S. researchers suggest probiotics -- in
> >yogurt or supplements -- may help stem ear infections, flu and other
> >illnesses common among children in day care.
>
> >Researchers at the Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington,
> >led by Dr. Daniel Merenstein, found a 19 percent decrease of common
> >infections in children who daily ingested probiotics.
>
> >Specifically, the children had 24 percent fewer gastrointestinal
> >infections -- such as diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting -- and 18 percent
> >fewer upper respiratory tract infections -- such as ear infections,
> >sinusitis and strep.
>
> >Read More:
> >http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2010/05/25/Probiotics-may-reduce-day-c...
>
> "funded by The Dannon Co. Inc."
>
> If you suspect Big Pharma of manipulating data, Why not suspect The
> Dannon Co. Inc. of doing the same thing. Dozens of independent funded
> studies in France and Europe have found problems with Dannon funded
> studies.
>
> --
> Bob Officer
> Posting the truthhttp://www.skeptics.com.au- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Newsgroups: alt.health, misc.kids.health, misc.health.alternative
From: Bob Officer <boboffic...(a)127.0.0.7>
Date: Sun, 06 Jun 2010 11:42:57 -0700
Local: Sun, Jun 6 2010 1:42 pm
Subject: Re: Do children with otitis media need antibiotics?
Reply | Reply to author | Forward | Print | Individual message | Show
original | Report this message | Find messages by this author


Note: The author of this message requested that it not be archived.
This message will be removed from Groups in 6 days (Jun 13, 1:42 pm).


On Sun, 6 Jun 2010 09:57:00 -0700 (PDT), in misc.health.alternative,



- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -

pautrey <rpautr...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>On Jun 6, 11:20 am, pautrey <rpautr...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>> On Jun 6, 11:16 am, pautrey <rpautr...(a)gmail.com> wrote:

>> > On Jun 6, 11:12 am, pautrey <rpautr...(a)gmail.com> wrote:


>> > >http://www.clinicaladvisor.com/do-children-with-otitis-media-need-ant....


>> > > Do children with otitis media need antibiotics?
>> > > May 18 2010


>> > > I have been told that pediatricians now state that most cases of
>> > > otitis media in children are viral in origin and do not require
>> > > antibiotic treatment. If this is true, what treatment do you
>> > > recommend? Watch and wait? Does the same approach apply to adults?
>> > > JOSEPH CAMIRE, DO, West Plains, Mo.


>> > > You have been told correctly. In 2004, the American Academy of
>> > > Pediatrics and the American Academy of Family Physicians published
>> > > joint clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of
>> > > acute otitis media (Pediatrics. 2004;113:1451-1465). The recommended
>> > > treatment for children older than age two years is pain management and
>> > > observation (unless the patient is severely ill). Such oral analgesics
>> > > as acetaminophen or ibuprofen are most effective. A topical anesthetic
>> > > like benzocaine is another option and can be used alone or in
>> > > conjunction with oral analgesics. Julee B. Waldrop, MS, PNP (139-4)


>> > > From the May 2010 Issue of Clinical Advisor


>> > >http://www.clinicaladvisor.com/do-children-with-otitis-media-need-ant....


>> > ---------------------------------------------------------------------------­ --------------------------------------


>> > Antibiotics Turn My Daughter Into a Crazy, Whining Mess
>> > Posted by Julie Ryan Evans on May 25, 2010 at 7:30 AM


>> >http://thestir.cafemom.com/toddler/103566/Antibiotics_Turn_My_Daughte.... quoted text -


>> > - Show quoted text -


>> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------­ ----------------------------------------


>> Antibiotics Can Cause Pervasive, Persistent Changes To Microbiota In
>> Human Gut


>> ScienceDaily (Nov. 19, 2008) Using a novel technique developed by
>> Mitchell Sogin of the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) to identify
>> different types of bacteria, scientists have completed the most
>> precise survey to date of how microbial communities in the human gut
>> respond to antibiotic treatment.


>> Read More:http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081118121941.htm- Hide quoted text -


>> - Show quoted text -


--------------------------------------------------------------------------­--------------------------------------




Advisor Forum

Do children with otitis media need antibiotics?
May 18, 2010



I have been told that pediatricians now state that most cases of
otitis media in children are viral in origin and do not require
antibiotic treatment. If this is true, what treatment do you
recommend? Watch and wait? Does the same approach apply to adults?—
JOSEPH CAMIRE, DO, West Plains, Mo.

You have been told correctly. In 2004, the American Academy of
Pediatrics and the American Academy of Family Physicians published
joint clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of
acute otitis media (Pediatrics. 2004;113:1451-1465). The recommended
treatment for children older than age two years is pain management and
observation (unless the patient is severely ill). Such oral analgesics
as acetaminophen or ibuprofen are most effective. A topical anesthetic
like benzocaine is another option and can be used alone or in
conjunction with oral analgesics.—Julee B. Waldrop, MS, PNP (139-4)

From the May 2010 Issue of Clinical Advisor


http://www.clinicaladvisor.com/do-children-with-otitis-media-need-antibiotics/article/170465/


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Originally published December 1 2008



Probiotics Improve Infant Immune Function
http://www.naturalnews.com/024968.html

by David Gutierrez, staff writer

(NaturalNews) A probiotic treatment for pregnant women and their
infants was successful in improving the immune function of the
newborns, in a study conducted by researchers from Helsinki University
Central Hospital in Finland and published in the journal Pediatrics.

"Our results support the idea that probiotics and prebiotics may
enhance immune maturation and protect infants against respiratory
pathogens," the researchers wrote.

Probiotics are live microorganisms, primarily bacteria, that have
beneficial health effects when living in the human body. For example,
many bacteria that live in the human gut aid in the process of
digestion; other probiotic bacteria are believed to improve immune
function. Prebiotics are substances that provide no direct nutrition
to the body, but that foster a healthier environment for probiotics. A
new field of research is emerging into dosing people with mixtures of
probiotics and prebiotics, in a practice known as "symbiotic
treatment."

Symbiotic treatment is already being used by some people to treat
infant allergies and autoimmune disorders, but the authors of the
current study warned that this practice has not been tested for its
safety.

The researchers treated pregnant woman with a mix of four probiotic
bacteria (Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and LC705, Bifidobacterium breve
Bb99 and Propionibacterium freudenreichii ssp shermanii) for the last
four weeks of pregnancy, then treated their newborns with the same
mixture plus prebiotics called galactooligosaccharides (GOSs) for the
first six months of life. GOSs are also found in breast milk.

The infants were examined after 3, 6 and 24 months, and the mothers
filled out questionnaires about the children's health at 3, 6, 12 and
24 months. The researchers found that while 28 percent of children in
the placebo group had been prescribed antibiotics, only 23 percent of
children in the probiotic group had. Likewise, the average number of
respiratory infections per child in the placebo group was 4.2,
compared with only 3.7 in the probiotic group.

The researchers did not find any difference in growth, infant colic,
morbidity or other adverse health effects between the two groups.

Sources for this story include: www.reuters.com; www.medscape.com

http://www.naturalnews.com/024968.html



All content posted on this site is commentary or opinion and is
protected under Free Speech. Truth Publishing LLC takes sole
responsibility for all content. Truth Publishing sells no hard
products and earns no money from the recommendation of products.
NaturalNews.com is presented for educational and commentary purposes
only and should not be construed as professional advice from any
licensed practitioner. Truth Publishing assumes no responsibility for
the use or misuse of this material. For the full terms of usage of
this material, visit www.NaturalNews.com/terms.shtml

http://www.naturalnews.com/024968.html

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Newsgroups: alt.health, misc.kids.health, misc.health.alternative
From: Bob Officer <boboffic...(a)127.0.0.7>
Date: Sun, 06 Jun 2010 11:42:57 -0700
Local: Sun, Jun 6 2010 1:42 pm
Subject: Re: Do children with otitis media need antibiotics?
Reply | Reply to author | Forward | Print | Individual message | Show
original | Report this message | Find messages by this author


Note: The author of this message requested that it not be archived.
This message will be removed from Groups in 6 days (Jun 13, 1:42 pm).


On Sun, 6 Jun 2010 09:57:00 -0700 (PDT), in misc.health.alternative,



- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -

pautrey <rpautr...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>On Jun 6, 11:20 am, pautrey <rpautr...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
>> On Jun 6, 11:16 am, pautrey <rpautr...(a)gmail.com> wrote:

>> > On Jun 6, 11:12 am, pautrey <rpautr...(a)gmail.com> wrote:


>> > >http://www.clinicaladvisor.com/do-children-with-otitis-media-need-ant....


>> > > Do children with otitis media need antibiotics?
>> > > May 18 2010


>> > > I have been told that pediatricians now state that most cases of
>> > > otitis media in children are viral in origin and do not require
>> > > antibiotic treatment. If this is true, what treatment do you
>> > > recommend? Watch and wait? Does the same approach apply to adults?
>> > > JOSEPH CAMIRE, DO, West Plains, Mo.


>> > > You have been told correctly. In 2004, the American Academy of
>> > > Pediatrics and the American Academy of Family Physicians published
>> > > joint clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of
>> > > acute otitis media (Pediatrics. 2004;113:1451-1465). The recommended
>> > > treatment for children older than age two years is pain management and
>> > > observation (unless the patient is severely ill). Such oral analgesics
>> > > as acetaminophen or ibuprofen are most effective. A topical anesthetic
>> > > like benzocaine is another option and can be used alone or in
>> > > conjunction with oral analgesics. Julee B. Waldrop, MS, PNP (139-4)


>> > > From the May 2010 Issue of Clinical Advisor


>> > >http://www.clinicaladvisor.com/do-children-with-otitis-media-need-ant....


>> > ---------------------------------------------------------------------------­ --------------------------------------


>> > Antibiotics Turn My Daughter Into a Crazy, Whining Mess
>> > Posted by Julie Ryan Evans on May 25, 2010 at 7:30 AM


>> >http://thestir.cafemom.com/toddler/103566/Antibiotics_Turn_My_Daughte.... quoted text -


>> > - Show quoted text -


>> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------­ ----------------------------------------


>> Antibiotics Can Cause Pervasive, Persistent Changes To Microbiota In
>> Human Gut


>> ScienceDaily (Nov. 19, 2008) Using a novel technique developed by
>> Mitchell Sogin of the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) to identify
>> different types of bacteria, scientists have completed the most
>> precise survey to date of how microbial communities in the human gut
>> respond to antibiotic treatment.


>> Read More:http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081118121941.htm- Hide quoted text -


>> - Show quoted text -


>--------------------------------------------------------------------------­--------------------------------------


>Probiotics may reduce day-care illnesses
>Published: May 25, 2010 at 8:51 PM


>WASHINGTON, May 25 (UPI) -- U.S. researchers suggest probiotics -- in
>yogurt or supplements -- may help stem ear infections, flu and other
>illnesses common among children in day care.


>Researchers at the Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington,
>led by Dr. Daniel Merenstein, found a 19 percent decrease of common
>infections in children who daily ingested probiotics.


>Specifically, the children had 24 percent fewer gastrointestinal
>infections -- such as diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting -- and 18 percent
>fewer upper respiratory tract infections -- such as ear infections,
>sinusitis and strep.


>Read More:
>http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2010/05/25/Probiotics-may-reduce-day-c...



"funded by The Dannon Co. Inc."

If you suspect Big Pharma of manipulating data, Why not suspect The
Dannon Co. Inc. of doing the same thing. Dozens of independent funded
studies in France and Europe have found problems with Dannon funded
studies.


--
Bob Officer
Posting the truth
http://www.skeptics.com.au