From: Welches on

<smith_bp101(a)hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1179348312.097709.13130(a)q23g2000hsg.googlegroups.com...
> What is the cut off point for an epidural? I seem to be getting
> conflicting answers. Some say 6cm, others say 7, some 8. Does the
> anethesiologist make that decision?
>
I had one at about 7cm. There wasn't any question of not being able to have
one at that point, I think they'd have done one at 8cm too. I think 9cm
they'd have tried to persuade me not to though.

> Also, on average how long is transistion labor? How much worse is it
> than active?
Depends on the person and the labour. Just as how long your labour will be
in total :-)
Debbie


From: Yiddishkeit on
On May 16, 4:45 pm, smith_bp...(a)hotmail.com wrote:
> What is the cut off point for an epidural? I seem to be getting
> conflicting answers. Some say 6cm, others say 7, some 8. Does the
> anethesiologist make that decision?
>

I had a spinal at 9 cm with #3 as the epidural would not have taken
effect until after the baby was born. I don't think there is a cut off
point, but there is a chance if you are late in the labour and you
want an epidural it would not take effect in time.


> Also, on average how long is transistion labor? How much worse is it
> than active?

transition can be differerent for every labour. I found transition
fine, I found pushing to be worse, I remember actually almost pushing
myself off the bed when I was pushing LOL. and i kept accidentally
kicking the nurses. (my doula and the nurse were each holding my legs
to help me push.


From: Cheryl on
On May 17, 6:45 am, smith_bp...(a)hotmail.com wrote:
> What is the cut off point for an epidural? I seem to be getting
> conflicting answers. Some say 6cm, others say 7, some 8. Does the
> anethesiologist make that decision?
>
The nurse/midwife will make the decision and it's usually based more
on how quickly you are progressing rather than where you are at the
time you ask for one. When I was in labour with my first I asked for
an epidural about 30 mins after I'd arrived at the hospital but when
they checked me I'd dilated 3cm in that 30 mins so they told me I
couldn't have one as I would be pushing by the time the anaesthetist
turned up.

> Also, on average how long is transistion labor? How much worse is it
> than active?

Transition is the point where I have *4 times* told the midwife that I
couldn't do it any more, there must be a better way of getting this
baby out, why can't I just be somewhere else while the baby is being
born. It's not so much that it's worse, it's more that you've been in
labour for long enough to know what the contractions are like so when
they change to get closer together I start to doubt that they are ever
going to stop even though I rationally know that they will. As for
average, well the amount of dilation you need to do is about 2-4cms so
it will take as long as it took you to dilate the 2-4cm before it
usually. In my case that meant 20mins, for some others it will more
like 1-2 hours.

Cheryl

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