From: Irrational Number on
kvicky wrote:

> I had a 20 weeks ultrasound done and the tech didn't find a bubble in
> baby's stomach, she has written maybe due to technical reasons. So I
> have another one scheduled at 23rd week, doctor says not to worry till
> the next ultrasound.

Get a second opinion. Go to another ultrasound
facility and pay out of pocket if necessary. Our
u/s doctor told us that Pillbug's brain did not
develop at 29 weeks and followed that sentence
with the information that there are two places
in the U.S. that do late-term terminations. To
this day, I hate him! He did, at least, tell us
that UC San Francisco does fetal MRIs, so we went
there and they told us that Pillbug's brain did,
indeed, develop, but we were to watch for possible
hydrocephalus (which did not happen, thank goodness).

The point is that, when faced with any possible
serious medical diagnosis, get a second opinion.
If I were you, I would go to a different facility
first. Going back to the same facility later will
give you some information, but it's still the same
equipment, possibly the same tech. You want to
get a second, independent opinion.

-- Anita --
From: kvicky on
On Jul 7, 4:34 pm, Irrational Number <nos...(a)nospam.com> wrote:
> kvickywrote:
> > I had a 20 weeks ultrasound done and the tech didn't find a bubble in
> > baby's stomach, she has written maybe due to technical reasons. So I
> > have another one scheduled at 23rd week, doctor says not to worry till
> > the next ultrasound.
>
> Get a second opinion. Go to another ultrasound
> facility and pay out of pocket if necessary. Our
> u/s doctor told us that Pillbug's brain did not
> develop at 29 weeks and followed that sentence
> with the information that there are two places
> in the U.S. that do late-term terminations. To
> this day, I hate him! He did, at least, tell us
> that UC San Francisco does fetal MRIs, so we went
> there and they told us that Pillbug's brain did,
> indeed, develop, but we were to watch for possible
> hydrocephalus (which did not happen, thank goodness).
>
> The point is that, when faced with any possible
> serious medical diagnosis, get a second opinion.
> If I were you, I would go to a different facility
> first. Going back to the same facility later will
> give you some information, but it's still the same
> equipment, possibly the same tech. You want to
> get a second, independent opinion.
>
> -- Anita --

My ultrsound results came out to be normal, thanks for all your posts.

Thanks

From: Pologirl on
On Jul 12, 12:09 pm, kvicky <kavitha.kulka...(a)gmail.com> wrote:
> My ultrsound results came out to be normal, thanks for all your posts.

Wonderful! Now will you be looking for a new obstetrician?

If anything else comes up, drop us a note. We always like to read a
birth notice. Even better, a birth story!

Pologirl

From: alath on
Sorry, caught this one late.

In case anyone else ever has this same issue, let me clear up a couple
of points from the discussion above:

Not seeing the stomach, not seeing fluid in the stomach, not seeing a
stomach bubble, not seeing amniotic fluid in the stomach, and not
seeing echolucent fluid in the stomach, are all exactly the same
thing. The fetal stomach cannot be visualized on ultrasound unless it
has fluid in it. One never really sees the stomach per se, rather, one
sees the fluid inside it. This is why knowledgeable and precise people
say they weren't able to visualize a stomach bubble, rather than
saying they weren't able to visualize the stomach.

If there is no fluid in the stomach, one of the following things is
going on:
1) just by coincidence, the stomach is empty because the fetus hasn't
happened to swallow any fluid in a while. If this is the case, the
amniotic fluid volume will be normal and the stomach bubble will
likely be seen on a follow up exam. This is the most common scenario.
It's a little bizarre that they said "likely due to technical
reasons," because this is really better described as "likely due to
bad luck," or "probably due to bad timing."
2) there is some kind of tracheo-esophageal malformation that prevents
swallowed fluid from getting to the stomach. In this case, the fluid
volume will be increased because the fetus is producing normal amounts
of fluid but not getting rid of it via swallowing. In this case, the
fluid level keeps increasing on subsequent exams and the stomach
bubble will never be seen.
3) the fetus could have some kind of neurologic condition that
prevents swallowing. Again, rising fluid and no bubble on subsequent
exams.
4) there might not be any amniotic fluid at all (as in renal agenesis,
for example). In this case, the fetus can't swallow fluid because it
isn't there. This would be the least common scenario and the absence
of amniotic fluid would certainly be commented upon.

Fortunately, it seems kvicky was in Club #1, which is the best one to
be in.

From: Pologirl on
On Jul 12, 12:56 pm, alath <a...(a)gateway.net> wrote:
> 1) just by coincidence, the stomach is empty because the fetus hasn't
> happened to swallow any fluid in a while. If this is the case, the
> amniotic fluid volume will be normal and the stomach bubble will
> likely be seen on a follow up exam. This is the most common scenario.
> It's a little bizarre that they said "likely due to technical
> reasons," because this is really better described as "likely due to
> bad luck," or "probably due to bad timing."

[deleted 3 other possible causes of "no bubble", clubs #2 - #4]

> Fortunately, it seems kvicky was in Club #1, which is the best one to
> be in.

I think kvicky was in Club #0: the stomach bubble was seen clearly
and was a normal size but its shade of black on the US image was
slightly different than usual. There are several technical reasons
for this to occur, that have nothing to do with the baby. The
obstetrician seems to have hugely misinterpreted the US report.

Pologirl

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